December 10, 2017

11/12/2017: Nutriad present gut health research at Global Feed Summit

Multinational feed additives producer Nutriad presented new gut health research at the recent Global Feed Summit in Bangkok (Thailand)

 
BK Chew
Image credit: Nutriad
The summit, organised by CMT (Centre for Management Technology) focused on the central them of improving feed safety, industry integration and innovations.

At the conference, Dr Swensen Huang - Nutriad, presented “Moving Towards Antibiotics-Free Era- Solutions & Strategies”. His presentation addressed the concerns of producers present, as they face an increasing pressure from markets and governments to eliminate AGPs from animal diets mounts.

The Presentation included new data of combining precision delivery coated butyrate (ADIMIX Precision) in starter feed and phytogenics (APEX 5) in grower and finisher feed comparing to AGP diets in boiler trials. The promising trial data generated a lot of interest and discussion among the delegates.

BK Chew, Regional Director APAC, emphasised the regulatory mandate to reduce or ban antibiotics in a number of countries in S.E. Asia, “Products that promote the animal performance by improving gut health without using AGPS are receiving much attention. From January 1, 2018, the regulatory bodies in Vietnam and Indonesia, will enforce the restriction of the types of antibiotics allowed as well as limiting its use to only early stages of growth.”


Visit the Nutriad website, HERE.
 

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This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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11/12/2017: Dr Anna Zhenchuk succeeds Dr Simone K. Frey as BioAnalyt's Managing Director

After more than eight years at BioAnalyt, Simone K. Frey has decided to leave BioAnalyt to pursue her entrepreneurial and venture capital activities

 
Dr Simone K. Frey 
Image credit: Bioanalyt

Simone transformed BioAnalyt from a university spin-off into a profitable, growing company with customers in over 80 countries. 

We will miss her but are excited for her new journey. She will leave effective by the end of this year, but will maintain a strong relationship with the company as business and market advisor. 




Dr Anna Zhenchuk
Image credit: Bioanalyt
Since Dr Anna Zhenchuk joined BioAnalyt in 2012 as Technical Director, she has developed new products and provided hands-on support to customers in over 30 countries.

Starting January 2018, she is taking over the role as managing director. Anna has a background in biotechnology as well as business administration and has lived in six countries.

In her new role, she is excited to continue BioAnalyt's vision, backed by a committed team: Democratising nutritional testing and driving transparency in food and nutrition.


Visit the Bioanalyt website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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11/12/2017: Addressing pandemic micronutrient deficiencies through flour fortification

by the International Federation for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus (IFSBH)

Flour fortification involves adding essential vitamins and mineral to flour as it is milled, which in turn makes foods prepared with fortified flour more nutritious

Iron, zinc, folic acid, and other B vitamins are commonly added to wheat and maize flours. The potential for fortified foods to help address global nutritional deficiencies has long been acknowledged, with fortification strategies increasingly being prioritised as our interest and understanding of micronutrient malnutrition, and its fundamental role in the overall burden of global disease, has developed. Almost 20 years ago, the World Health Organisation (WHO) identified iron, iodine, vitamin A and zinc deficiencies as being ‘among the world’s most serious health risk factors, ’ (World Health Report, 2000).
 


More than two billion people worldwide are now affected by micronutrient deficiencies. Contrary to popular belief, these dietary deficiencies are a global public health concern, not just an issue unique to developing countries, although undoubtedly this is where their burden is most keenly felt.

In an ideal world, everyone would eat a well-balanced, healthy diet, rich in all essential micronutrients to maintain good health. However, this ideal is over simplistic, and in reality a complex combination of social, environmental and economic factors make this basic prerequisite for good health unachievable for many. Food fortification has been utilised in industrialised societies for over three quarters of a century to replace vital nutrients lost as a result of food processing, so fortification is by no means a new concept. It is undoubtedly the most cost-effective way to ensure that people get enough vitamins and minerals through a non-health intervention.

Smarter Futures
Smarter Futures is a public-private-civic partnership that supports similar partnerships of flour millers, governments, vitamin and mineral suppliers, international organisations, and academic institutions to make fortification of wheat flour a reality in Africa. In countries, these partnerships are known as National Fortification Alliances. It is a sustainable fortification project, providing technical support and training for flour millers, government food control staff, academic institutions and other stakeholders in Africa involved in the fortification of wheat and maize flour with vitamins and minerals.

The project aims to improve the nutritional value of people’s diets through the fortification of flour, improving health and well-being and the health of future generations in Africa by the most successful, economically viable, cost effective and most importantly, sustainable means possible.

The Smarter Futures is the brainchild of project partners, the Food Fortification Initiative (FFI), AkzoNobel, Helen Keller International, and the International Federation for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus (IF), co-financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, and supported both financially and technically by many other organisations, including the Laboratory of Cereal Technology, Ghent University, Belgium. The project partners are all committed to the primary prevention of health concerns caused by vitamin and mineral deficiencies, such as Neural Tube Defects (NTDs), impaired learning capacity and decreased productivity.


Read the full article, HERE.
 

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This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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Bastak company profile


Bastak was established in 1999 by the current Director, Mr Zeki Demirtasoglu as  Bastak Gida Makine Medikal Paz.Ith.Ihr.San.Tic.Ltd.Sti..
  
The company produces flour additives and quality control apparatus. Their aim is to be the market leader in the sector and to keep up with the latest innovations. The fundamental principle of the company is client satisfaction. For this purpose, no expense is spared in the quest for new technologies.


Bastak takes part in domestic and foreign fairs as both exhibitor and visitor in order to follow the most recent global developments and to introduce its own innovations.


The company expanded its horizons in 2003 by establishing its Foreign Trade Department and began to export. Bastak is aware that the only way to be able to exist in a dynamic global market is to produce consistently high quality products. For this reason, the company gives great importance to work studies and research.



Visit the website HERE.

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This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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December 07, 2017

08/12/2017: Geelen Counterflow’s sustainability focused electrical dryer

Early in 2018 Geelen Counterflow will introduce its new generation of Electrical Dryers to the market

Following four years of development, the first Electrical Dryer for 10-12 tph extruded petfood will be built and delivered in 2018. 

 
www.geelencounterflow.com
Pilot line testing on extruded petfood during 2016 has shown that energy efficiency can be improved by up to 65 percent, to well below 1000 kJ per kg of evaporated water, compared to the typical 2700 kJ/kg for a counterflow dryer on natural gas or steam.

When the energy for the new Electrical Dryer is from renewable sources, the CO2 footprint of the drying process can be virtually eliminated. The dryer is typically the single biggest energy consumer in an extrusion line, so any attempt to reduce energy consumption or improve the CO2 footprint of extrusion plants should start with the dryer.

The air system of the Electrical Dryer uses high temperature heat pumps to generate hot air of 125 degrees Celsius. As an option the same air system can be fitted with full capacity gas burners for boosting of hot air temperatures.

Geelen Counterflow’s mission is to build the best dryers and coolers for the feed and food industry and to be 100 percent sustainable in doing so. Enabling operators of extrusion lines to dry their products without the use of fossil fuels is a big part of that mission.

Official market launch of the Electrical Dryer will be during Victam Asia 2018 (March 27-29, 2018).

Visit the Galeen Counterflow website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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08/12/2017: Much more investment needed to reverse the rise in hunger

The recent increase in the number of hungry people in the world requires immediate action to reverse this situation, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva told members of the FAO Council on Monday 4th December

He noted that the latest hunger figure - 815 million people - marked the first increase after more than a decade of steady decline. Obesity and overweight are also growing, in developed and developing countries, posing another cost of current food systems, he noted.
 
FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva addresses the Council
Image credit: FAO

"The most important thing to do now is to build the resilience of poor people to face the impacts of conflicts and climate change," making sure that humanitarian assistance is combined with development actions to chart a course towards the eradication of hunger by 2030, he said.

"This basically means new investments - I would say much more investments - from the public but also the private sector," Mr Graziano da Silva said.

The FAO Council manages administrative and financial affairs between biennial meetings of the FAO Conference. Eight cabinet-level officials - from Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Zambia, Paraguay and the Russian Federation - are participating in the week-long meeting, which side events focusing on climate change, migration and food safety as well as World Soil Day on Tuesday.

The year ahead
The Director-General outlined major events in 2018, including high-level international symposia on agroecology, on Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems, a third on innovation for smallholder and family farmers that is also in the works, and plans to launch an International Platform for Biodiversity.

Those initiatives are designed "to support countries to put in place sustainable agricultural practices that combine food production, ecosystem services and climate-change resilience at the same time," Mr Graziano da Silva said.

Key opportunities "to put the fight against hunger back on track" come early in the year, at the African Union summit in Ethiopia and at FAO's regional conferences, including the first one to be held in Sudan.

During 2018, FAO will also act as co-chair of the Global Migration Group, comprised of 22 United Nations agencies and mandated to help draft - by the end of 2018 - a Global Compact on Safe, Regularly and Orderly Migration agreement.

As the Council reviews budgetary matters, Mr Graziano da Silva also noted FAO's efforts to boost its focus and effectiveness through the development of five Strategic Programme teams as well as other institutional measures aimed at decentralisation, at increased use of South-South and triangular cooperation and streamlining the Organisation's country office network to assure greater flexibility in the use of budgeted resources.


Read the original news release on the FAO website, HERE.
 

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This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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08/12/2017: Scaling up nutrition: Tanzania hits the road

by Steve Godfrey, Chief Investment Officer, Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN)

Tanzania has launched its five-year strategy to tackle malnutrition, and reviewed progress – the National Multisectoral Nutrition Action Plan (NMNAP)


Political leadership was in abundance. But equally encouraging is the size and quality of efforts to build the machinery to deliver it, some real positives.
 


First, leadership
Some feared that the exceptional personal commitment of former President Kikwete on nutrition would be a hard act to follow. PM Kasim Majaliwa, as well as the Finance and Health Ministers spent two hours at the session.

Vice President (VP) Mama Suluhu brought a team of five ministers to the national summit on strengthening food fortification. The passion is evident – but backed by specific budget, performance and staffing commitments (more below). It’s unusual to hear a Minister of Finance speak 15 minutes on malnutrition – its damage to the economy and harshest impact on the poorest. He is appointing a focal point in the Ministry to handle nutrition, maybe a first.

Second, budget commitment and spending
This year government will double spending to Tz11bn shillings (US$6M) for local government actions for nutrition support to Maternal Infant and Young Child and Adolescent Nutrition (MIYCAN) – now adding adolescents to mothers, infants and young children. In the past budgets have been underspent (52% in 2016/17), so the VP is bringing regional commissioners together next month to sign performance contracts to deliver this.

The Expenditure Tracking Unit in Finance has set up a new national nutrition budget code. The President’s Office will soon have 10 nutrition advisers to drive implementation (the Deputy Ministers in the Prime Minister and President’s office also attended and spoke). Overall, the number of local nutrition workers will rise from 120 to over 600 next year.

Third, while not perfect (what is?) one real quality of the strategy is its breadth
UNICEF’s Maniza Zaman said, this is not just a measurement framework on results, but also on resource flows and accountability. The systems put in place need development partners to up their game in reporting, but a good set of tracking and reporting scorecards are in place.

Finally, there is growing capacity and commitment at community and local government level – presentations on local in-clinic alternative models for Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF), using traditional leaders to manage Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM), new ways to identify and screen children, and using local foods better. The 100 local nutrition officers, civil society and academe present were passionate.


Read the full article, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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Extru-Tech Inc company profile


Founded in 1985, Extru-Tech® has installed numerous extrusion systems worldwide designed for the production of human food, pet food, aquatic feed and animal feed products. 

Extru-Tech® also maintains the reputation of supplying the extrusion industry with superior quality replacement parts.

Extru-Tech® currently produces and markets one of the industry's most complete lines of extrusion processing systems.

In addition, they offer a full line of
ancillary equipment and customised equipment solutions for specialised processes

Visit the website HERE.












The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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07/12/2017: Airless storage bag, a new organic process for insect pest control in food and seeds storage

The company nOx, subsidiary of the Poujaud’s group, commercialised since July 2017 is an innovative under control atmosphere storage process and accessible to all

This technique is feasible thanks to the big bag nOx. It permits a perfect seed and grain protection from all sorts of insect pests without using any chemicals, neither liquid nor gas, or even cold chain. This method avoids the issues of pesticide residues and insect mutations.
 

Image credit: nOx

Big bag nOx contains an intern gas hermitical liner with a suction valve. When the bag is filled up and sealed, a simple vacuum cleaner permits to create partial vacuum. The extracted air is replaced by an equivalent volume of CO2 (alimentary CO2- inert gas). Anoxia is lethal for free insects. But a three week treatment with CO2 will also permit to eradicate hidden insects (worms and eggs). Another advantage is the seed preservation from humidity and against new pest contamination in the storage place.

This technique is perfectly appropriate for organic seeds and legumes, for instance as a satisfactory control of bruchid on lentils. No specific and expensive equipment is required to use the big bag nOx. A classic soldering clip to seal the liner, a domestic vacuum cleaner and a blower.

Big bag nOx are also adapted for automatic bagging line with blowing to format the liner before filling. Big bag nOx dimensions are 900x900x1600 mm with a capacity of 1200 kg. 


Visit the nOx storage website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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December 06, 2017

07/12/2017: Vortex obtains new international standard, demonstrating quality and consistency

In November 2017, Vortex, a dry bulk solids handling company, was certified to the ISO 9001:2015 standard, previously, Vortex was certified under the ISO 9001:2008 standard, and has been ISO-certified for more than 10 years

ISO 9001 is an international standard that specifies requirements for a management system. By gaining ISO 9001:2015 certification, ISO 9001 acknowledges that Vortex has demonstrated the ability to consistently provide products and services that meet customer and regulatory requirements.
 

Image credit: Vortex

In essence, the ISO 9001 standard acknowledges Vortex’s credibility as a reliable and consistent supplier of material handling equipment and technical services to the dry bulk solids industry.

Among the major changes of ISO 9001:2015 versus ISO 9001:2008 was a transition of emphasis from “preventative actions” and “required documentation” to “top-down leadership and communication” and “business opportunity/risk assessment.”

 This communication emphasis includes more open communication with customers and suppliers, and greater information transparency within the organization and its shareholders. Over time, Vortex will gather data on the effectiveness of these communication channels and refine their approaches to best communicate with internal and external audiences.

To improve internal transparency, Vortex top management created a document to assess both short-term and long-term opportunities and risks for the company’s operations, and developed strategies for how those opportunities and risks will be approached to improve the business.

Vortex top management also developed a long-term business plan to provide employees and stakeholders with a clear understanding of the company’s goals and strategic objectives for the future.

“By making these revisions in our management processes, we hope to continue building customer trust and piece-of-mind around our improving operations,” said Mark Sander, standards manager at Vortex.

“By keeping current on ISO standards, we are able to use their guidelines as a road map for how to most efficiently operate our business, while also being focused on continuous improvement opportunities. The end goal for each of these changes made by top management is to improve satisfaction among Vortex employees, its customers and its suppliers.”


Visit the Vortex website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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07/12/2017: Nutriad launches MycoGut Academy

Multinational feed additives producer Nutriad, global leader in practical solutions for Mycotoxin Management, received customers and distribution partners in Belgium for the inaugural sessions of the MycoGut Academy

 
Image credit: Nutriad
In close cooperation with the University of Ghent an interactive poultry focused program was designed, that included practical and class rooms sessions. The international group of industry professionals from the Middle East that attended this first edition highly rated the event.

As consumers and governments across the world push for a restriction on the use of antibiotic growth promoters in animal production, Nutriad is taking the lead in offering high quality solutions that address bacterial challenges.

As there is no single additive that replaces antibiotics, Nutriad promotes a combination of products from different product platforms.

Radka Borutova, Business Development Manager Mycotoxin Management, presented on Clostridium Perfringens induced necrotic enteritis, highlighting the importance to focus on predisposing factors that can influence the severity of the challenge, such as Mycotoxicosis.

Dr Gunther Antonissen from the University of Ghent made a valuable contribution by elaborating on Deoxynivalenol and the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers.

The practical session at the veterinary faculty of the University of Ghent was one of the highlights of MycoGut. It allowed attendees to learn more on identifying necrotic enteritis and different types of mycotoxins, but also to see the incremental effect of mycotoxicosis on bacterial challenges.

Erik Visser, CEO Nutriad, concluded, “The MycoGut Academy is another example of how Nutriad interacts with its’ customers and distribution partners, transferring knowledge and jointly creating multi-platform solutions that address real life production challenges.”


Visit the Nutriad website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

07/12/2017: CLFMA applauds the Indian government’s national action plans on feed and livestock sectors

Recently, the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying, and Fisheries (DADF) under the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare, Government of India, released “National Action Plans” focusing on various sub-sectors of India’s dynamic livestock industry

 
Image credit: Aurinko on Flickr
(CC BY 2.0)
These documents provide in-depth insights on each sub-sector such as poultry and egg; feed and fodder; and also sheep, goat and pig meats with a comprehensive roadmap to double farmers’ incomes by 2022.

“For doubling farmers’ incomes, livestock sector is indispensable. These national action plans on feed and livestock sectors by the DADF are truly commendable efforts in the right direction. CLFMA whole heartedly welcomes the government’s proactive initiatives like these” commented Mr B Soundararajan, Chairman of CLFMA, the apex industry association representing India’s livestock and meat sectors.

Mr Soundararajan termed them “quite extensive and holistic” roadmaps.

“CLFMA represents the entire animal protein value chain and we are pleased to see such detail-oriented and comprehensive blueprints on each sub-sector. We find these documents aptly echoing and highlighting ourkey demands such as conducive policies for supporting entrepreneurship, skill building, investing in technology and cold chain infrastructure, promoting awareness on good farming practices etc.” he commented.

Citing that poultry, egg and dairy sectors were given greater emphasis in the action plans, Mr Soundararajan applauded the government’s drive towards enhancing farmers’ profits and said,  “India’s promising dairy sector needs more initiatives like Fodder & Feed Security Program – 2022 to transform itself to meet the fast growing demand for milk and milk products. We fully endorse the government’s view that availability, quality and affordability of fodder and concentrates are essential for improving productivity of milch animals.”

He also acknowledged that the action plan on egg and poultry addresses many critical issues including feed raw materials, technology and mechanisation.

“Feed accounts for more than two-thirds of the production cost of chicken meat. Hence we fully endorse the government’s keen focus on ensuring availability, prices and quality of these raw materials such as maize and soybean. Similarly, India’s poultry sector has evolved and is fully ready for technology upgradation”, he quoted.

On the livestock sector’s contribution towards food and nutrition security, Mr Soundararajan said, “It is a shared responsibility and CLFMA is committed to work with all the industry stakeholders including government, for effective implementation of these action plans.”

Reflecting upon what else would help propel the industry’s growth, he opined there are a few issues that are to be addressed on priority, “Quality feed is the necessary prerequisite to improve animal productivity particularly in dairy and its affordability is absolutely critical here. However, currently oil seeds and oil meals attract five percent GST, which adds to the overall cost of production of scientifically manufactured compound feed.”

 He further added that exempting both will help make compound feed more affordable and said, “Ultimately farmers will get benefitted as animal productivity improves significantly with the use of balanced and nutritious feed.”


Visit the DADF website, HERE.
 

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This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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07/12/2017: The importance of not taking our food for granted

by Chris Jackson, Export Manager, UK TAG

Back here in the UK our Christmas festivities are about to start and we look forward to another New Year
 
Chris Jackson

The seasons and years march on and in this ever changing and adapting world; farming and food production remain a constant necessity, something that whenever I can I remind politicians of. I think at times they lose sight of mankind’s need for food, as they mostly so very far divorced from the realities of food production.

In our modern, urban, developed world food is taken for granted, not so in much of our less developed countries where wars and natural disasters cause mass famine and starvation. This should be unacceptable in today’s world.

Natural disasters fire, flood, drought, we can do little about, but the continuing warring is totally man made and therefore avoidable.
 


Farming and food production should be a concern of all thinking political leaders. Within our global industry, we are becoming more and more efficient at producing an increasing amount of food - in very innovative ways using high technology and science to aid us.

Quantity of production is paramount, and unless you can find very lucrative high return niche markets then yield is the key driver to farmer’s profitability.

As most of the worlds consumers want food as cheaply as possible this adds even more pressure to the farmers, who now in the western world are driven to production systems that for livestock are welfare friendly, this means added cost to production and in some instances lower outputs. In addition, all farmers’ crops, vegetables and stock, have to look at production methods that do not have damaging effects on our environment.

Most small scale farmers have been doing this over decades as they know that their land is the most precious asset that they have, and they need it to be productive not only for themselves but for their families who will follow them. This is not always the case for the industrial conglomerates who see farming as a short-term income stream.


Read the full article, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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Taixing Xiqiao Rolls Factory company profile



Taixing Xiqiao Rolls Factory is located in the beautiful riverside city, Taixing. It was established in 1995 and a professional factory that manufactures flour milling rolls, feed rolls and oil flaking rolls.

Its process formula and technology are originally from the Wuxi Grain Machine Factory that drafted the rolls industry standard.

In 2004, Taixing Xiqiao adopted the advanced international formula and process technology, and manufactured vanadium and titanium alloy rolls.

Vanadium and titanium alloy grinder rolls are advanced technology with low hardness and high wear resistance. Its main features include wear resistance, power saving, heat resistance, and less deformation. Overall resulting in increased economic benefits for customers.

In 2013, Taixing Xiqiao Rolls Factory and Henan University of Technology, jointly drafted the National standard of Grain and Oil machinery-Roll.

According to the Taixing Xiqiao website, “We provide various kinds of best cost-effective and high quality rolls for worldwide customers need”.


Visit the company website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


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06/12/2017: Meeting of the International Grains Council

Members of the International Grains Council (IGC) convened for the 46th Council Session in Brussels, on 5 December 2017

The meeting was chaired by Ms Silke Boger, Head of Unit, DG Agriculture and Rural Development, European Commission. The latest supply and demand outlook and market developments for grains, rice and oilseeds were assessed (based on GMR 483), while recent changes in national policies and administrative matters were considered.
 

World total grains (wheat and coarse grains) production was forecast at 2,079m t in 2017/18, second only to the previous season’s record. Much of the 54m t y/y (year-on-year) decline in output is tied to a reduction for maize (-39m), although wheat (-5m), barley (-7m) and sorghum (-2m) crops were also expected to be smaller. Consumption was predicted to surpass 2.1bn t for the first time and including new peaks for food, feed and industrial uses. Amid smaller availabilities and record usage, world total grains stocks were predicted to tighten for the first time since 2012/13, dropping by 28m t y/y, primarily because of a fall for maize. Despite a potential pullback in wheat, barley and sorghum flows, larger maize shipments were seen lifting grains trade for a fifth consecutive year, to 359m t.

Winter wheat seeding in the northern hemisphere planting was well advanced by early December, with the preliminary forecast for world 2018/19 all-wheat harvested area showing little y/y change. Despite some concerns about dryness in some growers, crop conditions were reported to be mostly favourable ahead of the winter.

Mainly reflecting prospects for smaller crops in Asia, world rice production in 2017/18 was projected to retreat by 1% y/y, to 482m t, albeit still the second largest outturn on record. With global use seen little changed y/y, end-season carryovers were expected to fall slightly, to 121m t, as a reduction in the major exporters – tied to contractions in India, Thailand, the USA and Vietnam – was only partly offset by nominal accumulation in China. After the current calendar year’s sharp rise on big deliveries to Asia and Africa, trade in 2018 was predicted to decline marginally but, at about 43m t, would be historically high.

Despite prospects for a record harvested area, global soyabean output in 2017/18 was forecast to edge lower, to 348m t, on an anticipated retreat in yields, most notably in Brazil and the USA. With consumption expected to grow further on firm demand from feed sectors spanning livestock, poultry and aquaculture, aggregate inventories were set to tighten, by 9% y/y, to 41m t. Within the total, major exporters’ reserves were anticipated to be down by nearly one-fifth as a potential increase in the USA was outweighed by falls in Argentina and Brazil. Boosted by China’s needs, world trade was seen rising by 4%, to a peak of 153m t.

The IGC Grains and Oilseeds Index (GOI) was only modestly above year earlier levels, with advances for wheat, barley and rice just about offsetting declines for maize and soyabeans. Despite ample overall availabilities, average wheat prices were firmer amid relatively tight milling grade supplies. A well-supplied market has resulted in slightly softer maize values y/y, with exporters competing hard for available business. Despite being highly volatile at times, soyabean quotations were modestly weaker y/y, mainly on supply-side pressure, outweighing underlying support from firm international demand. Largely linked to demand-led gains in the first half of 2017, rice export values were around 15% higher y/y. The Council also noted strength in world freight markets, with the Baltic Dry Index rising by 27% y/y, including increases across all constituent segments.

The Council considered administrative matters, including an update on progress with its economic work programme. The Secretariat presented its five-year baseline projections of supply and demand for wheat, maize (corn), rice and soyabeans (covering the period to 2022/23).

Mr Gary Martin, President of the IGTC provided an update on the current developments in policy and trade practice. The Council received statements from the FAO, on recent developments, and welcomed the participation of Taipei (Chinese) Separate Customs Territory as an observer.

The Council appointed Mr Arnaud Petit (EU-France), currently Director of Commodities and Trade at Copa-Cogeca, Brussels as the next Executive Director of the International Grains Council, with effect from 1 February 2018.


The full report mentioned above can be viewed on the IGC website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

December 05, 2017

06/12/2017: Wilmar enters into agreement to purchase edible oil facilities in Kuantan from Cargill

Wilmar International Limited has announced that its wholly-owned subsidiary, Wilmar Kuantan Edible Oils Sdn. Bhd., has entered into an agreement with Cargill Palm Plantation Sdn. Bhd. for the purchase of Cargill’s edible oil facilities in Kuantan, Malaysia

 
Image credit: One Village Initiative on Flickr
(CC BY-SA 2.0)

The edible oil facilities include a palm oil refinery and a neighbouring storage facility. The sale will be completed upon approval from all relevant authorities and certain conditions being fulfilled. The transfer of ownership is expected to occur by the end of 2018.

Yee Chek Toong, Wilmar’s Country Head of Malaysia said, “The acquisition of the Kuantan edible oil facilities marks our first presence in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The facilities are a good fit with our refining business and will strengthen our sales and distribution network in Malaysia. Besides serving the local market, the facilities’ strategic location in the Kuantan Port is an advantage for regional exports.”

Chai Wei-Joo, managing director of Cargill’s palm oil business in Malaysia said, “While we have made the strategic business decision to sell the Kuantan facilities, Cargill remains committed to our edible oil business in Malaysia and will continue operations at our two other facilities in Port Klang and Westport.”


Visit the Wilmar International website, HERE.

Visit the Cargill website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

06/12/2017: Register now for the 11th annual AFIA Pet Food Conference at IPPE

From modernising pet food labels to evaluating new pet food ingredients, the American Feed Industry Association’s (AFIA) upcoming conference is sure to give industry leaders the information they need to be effective in a changing marketplace

The 11th annual Pet Food Conference will be held Jan. 30, 2018, in conjunction with the International Production & Processing Expo (IPPE) in Atlanta, Georgia.
  

www.petfoodconference.com
“The annual AFIA Pet Food Conference is an affordable conference that brings together nearly 400 of the top experts and leaders in the ever-growing and changing pet food industry,” said Leah Wilkinson, AFIA’s vice president of legislative, regulatory and state affairs. “Happening alongside the largest event of its kind representing the animal food and ingredients industry, this year’s line-up of diverse speakers will cover everything from regulatory issues to technical aspects to benefit everyone in this unique animal food manufacturing sector.”

Experts in the field will discuss emerging industry issues, including domestic and global industry trends, challenges and opportunities in the ingredient supply, modernisation of the American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) pet food label, animal health, and more.

Speakers will represent associations, private entities and universities. The full agenda is available on the conference’s website, HERE.

Online registration for IPPE and the Pet Food Conference is open. Interested individuals are encouraged to register by December 31st to receive the early-bird rate of $75. On-site registration will also be available at a cost of $95.

IPPE is expected to attract more than 30,000 attendees and is a collaboration of three trade shows, the International Feed Expo, International Poultry Expo and International Meat Expo, representing the entire chain of protein production and processing. The event is sponsored by AFIA, the US Poultry & Egg Association and the North American Meat Institute.

More information about IPPE, including registration details, lodging and education offerings, is available on the website, HERE
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

06/12/2017: The history of earth and the soil

by Cliff Spencer, M4L Chairman

Milling is important to developing countries because grains in their raw whole form cannot be properly digested by humans, grains need grinding, cracking, flaking, popping or puffing before eating


 
Cliff Spencer
Of course looking at a whole grain in your hand it gives all the appearance of being dead or inert, whereas the exact opposite is the truth. A study under the microscope reveals the intricate composition of a grain as a living thing with intricate in-built survival mechanisms.

A grain has evolved to survive the seasons so it can germinate and grow again to continue its species. Indeed I spent the early part of my farming career trying to variously overcome this built in survival system and capacity of grains so as to encourage them to germinate and grow at their earliest opportunity. I soon learnt there were significant differences between the various grains and with that a whole bag (pardon the pun) of agronomic tricks to coax them out of their slumber whilst in the bin in which they were stored. This was achieved through a series of temperature changes, movement and even seed treatments.

Also when and how the seeds were planted in the soil, the soil type, aspect of the field with regard to sunlight and shade and other factors were all important parameters to consider and manipulate. Even the way in which these seeds were planted made a difference to their emergence and survival and indeed their subsequent vigour and emergence and thus the harvested yield and quality of the crop they ultimately produced.
 


Grains are the result of a super-efficient process that involves transforming sunlight, nutrients, water and air into macronutrients. Humans as farmers commenced growing grains for food in an organised fashion around 15,000 years ago. So in mankind’s history and evolution then intentionally growing grain is actually a very new way of supplying food for sustenance. It is hard to absorb that fact when grains are now such a huge global industry, being both a staple part of the Western diet and an important industrial feedstock.

Indeed, grains were originally used principally in the winter months, by humans to provide food when fresh food was difficult to find. As a result humans began to settle in areas where grain could be grown. To further complicate the story there is a school of thought that postulates our bodies and alimentary tract may not have evolved in the preceding hundreds of thousands of years to this very new agricultural era in historical terms, in order to digest grains effectively.


Read the full article, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

Next Instruments company profile


Next Instruments has brought together a range of innovative analytical and process instruments suitable for use in the Food, Agricutlure and Nutrition markets.

Next Instruments has procured and licensed a number of instruments developed in Australia and is marketing them through its worldwide network of dealers and distributors.

These instruments have been developed by the CSIRO, various universities and local companies. These products offer innovative solutions to the analysis of food, grains, dairy products, meat products, beverages, feeds and meals.

Next Instruments now has a range of 20+ products with excellent software packages, sampling accessories and data processing tools, which have achieved a significant level of sales both domestically and internationally.

Next Instruments has established a worldwide network of dealers covering:

North and South America
USA, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Ecuador, Columbia, Chile.

Europe
France, UK, Italy, Spain, Portugal, The Netherlands, Belgium, Greece, Eastern Europe

Asia
China, Taiwan, Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, India.

South Pacific
Australia, New Guinea, Fiji, Solomons, New Zealand.

Middle East and Southern Africa
Lebanon, Iran, Turkey, Republic of South Africa

Visit the Next Instruments website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

December 04, 2017

05/12/2017: Evonik to launch new global marketing campaign on MetAMINO®

Best quality, best handling, best performance: How Evonik’s leading amino acid DL-methionine helps support efficient livestock production is the key focus of the new global campaign “Best results with MetAMINO®”
 

Through a series of adverts and the dedicated website, Evonik aims to connect with decision makers in the feed and livestock industries to demonstrate how MetAMINO® enables customers to optimise their productivity, and decrease operational costs due to its intrinsic value as pure and effective methionine source.

Evonik will address a range of functions within the livestock and feed industry with its “Best results”-campaign. Aimed at various targets groups from purchasers to nutritionists and feed production managers, the new online platform is at the heart of the campaign and contains important and yet easy to understand information about why MetAMINO® is the most efficient methionine source available.

On the new microsite, visitors will find a modern mix of infographics, videos and short clips with varying levels of detail to browse and learn about the benefits of MetAMINO®. In addition, the new online hub is optimised for the use on mobile devices.

The “Best results”-campaign will feature across the industry’s leading trade journals and online portals. During 2018, the campaign will be a cornerstone of Evonik’s Animal Nutrition market communication. Evonik’s Animal Nutrition business is a globally operating provider of science-driven products and services for sustainable and efficient production of meat, fish, eggs and milk.

More than 60 years of experience in the production of essential amino acids for animal nutrition make Evonik a highly reliable partner for customers in over 100 countries today. Additionally, the company’s scientific excellence helps to conserve natural resources and reduce the ecological footprint.


Visit the MetAMINO® website, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

05/12/2017: Safe and quality food: A shared responsibility – A need for training and capacity building

by Raghavan 'Ragha' Sampathkumar

Continuing from my last column, there are several areas where food chain stakeholders must join hands and invest to ensure food that reaches the consumer is safe and is of good quality at affordable prices
 
Raghavan
Sampathkumar

When looking at the Asian region, there are at least 600 million farmers and majority are smallholders. In most countries, these smallholders neither have the knowledge and financial capacity individually to access domestic or export markets nor have any formalised institutional system to support them in terms of providing knowledge on best practices, technological know-how and most importantly, finance.

These farmers are staring blankly at the fast growing food industry in Asia that is struggling to source good quality raw materials and agricultural produce. This situation is common across all commodities and needs concerted efforts by all stakeholders is essential to benefit both ends of the food chain – farmers and consumers.

Some of the most critical aspects that require immediate attention are: safety (e.g. free from contamination); residue-free (e.g. chemicals, heavy metals etc.); and improved shelf life particularly for perishables. At one point of time, secondary standards were absolutely necessary to gain consumers’ confidence and as a result, premium prices.

But with mushrooming of several such standards since the last decade, consumers are increasingly becoming confused. Regulatory agencies worldwide are becoming more cognizant of these kinds of multiple third-party certifications and sooner or later, these certifications and labels may also get scrutinised strictly.
 


At least a few major food industry players have already started their own means of assuring their customers and consumers of their good quality and compliance to sustainability commitments instead of the third-party certifications. It must be noted that such an effort strongly turns the emphasis on improving their supply chain, which may even surpass the third-party standards. However, this is only a beginning of yet another phenomenon to win consumers’ trust.

Whatever may be the means to reassure the consumer of quality, it is important to build capacity within their respective supply chains and those efforts must reach to the last mile. Farmers must be at the core of these efforts wherein several companies can join hands on what is termed as “Pre-competitive partnerships”. Farmers must be trained on responsible use of inputs. For example, training on responsible use of chemicals for agriculturists and judicious use of antibiotics for the livestock farmers are absolutely critical to ensure sustainable production of quality and safe food.


Read the full article, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com