December 19, 2014

Season's Greetings!


Season’s Greetings to our readers from all of us here at Perendale Publishers! A big thank you for following our blog this year, and here’s wishing you a great holiday and a Happy New Year!  

 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

Brock Grain Systems company profile


http://www.gfmt.co.uk/brock

BrockGrain Systems has a long-standing tradition of demonstrating innovative leadership in developing, marketing and supporting grain facility solutions worldwide.
·      1957 Brock was founded (Milford)
·      1976 Brock became part of CTB, Inc.
·      1997 CTB purchased the grain bin division of Butler Manufacturing (Kansas City, Missouri)
·      2000 CTB acquired ABC Industries’ grain handling equipment
·      2002 CTB acquired Beard Industries, Inc. (Frankfort, Indiana)
·      2012 CTB purchased the assets of Martin Industries, Corp. and its related subsidiaries including LeMar Industries Corp. (Des Moines, Iowa) and Riley Equipment Inc. (Vincennes, Indiana)



Read the article HERE.
 


The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

19/12/2014: Crash in Oil Prices Cuts US Corn Price Estimates for 2015/16


Projected US farm corn prices in 2015/16 are US$3.79 per bushel, a dip of 10 cents compared to last month, according to December forecasts released this week by the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at the University of Missouri, AgWeb reports.
 
Looking forward, prices are expected to remain below the cost of production, with FAPRI forecasting a price of US$3.98 per bushel by 2018/19. 

While those numbers aren't optimal, those prices are higher than the US$3.50 per bushel forecast for 2014/15. The projected decline in corn production is contributing to an increase in prices, but that price growth is also being moderated by the decline in oil prices, according to Pat Westhoff, FAPRI director.

http://www.agweb.com/article/crash-in-oil-prices-cuts-corn-price-estimates-for-201516-ed-clark/

The good news? Lower oil prices should lower fuel costs to farmers as well as reduce corn prices. Still, the oil price crash overall will probably improve net farm income more than it will lower crop prices.

 

“The biofuel side of the story is much more complicated and uncertain but potentially more important,” Westhoff says. With lower gasoline prices, people will probably drive more, which should push up the use of gasoline and ethanol in 10 percent blends.

But there is a good chance this will be outweighed by two opposing factors, according to Westhoff.

1. Lower oil prices will make ethanol more expensive relative to gasoline, and that probably reduces the already small amount of ethanol used in E-15 and E-85 fuel.

2. With ethanol more expensive relative to gasoline, the corn-based fuel probably makes it less attractive to other countries, so US ethanol exports that are now the largest in years may well decline. Ethanol exports would be less than they would have been with higher oil prices, he explains.

“These negative effects on ethanol demand are likely to outweigh the positive, so the net effect is less demand for ethanol, which translates into lower corn prices,” Westhoff says.

Looking at other crops, FAPRI projects 2014/15 soybean prices of US$10 per bushel, unchanged from last month, but that drops to US$8.78 for the 2015/16 marketing year. Prices are likely to remain below US$10 per bushel through 2018/19, FAPRI says. 

“Continued high US soybean acreage in 2015 and large global supplies weigh on projected soybean prices,” Westhoff says.

Wheat prices have been higher than anticipated so far in the current marketing year, with FAPRI’s 2014/15 projection calling for prices of US$6.01 per bushel, up 11 cents from the November estimate. But for 2015/16, Westhoff says large global grain supplies reduce wheat prices almost US$1 per bushel at US$5.05. Prices rise in subsequent years, but remain below US$5.50 through 2017/18.



Read the article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

19/12/2014: Biomin announces opening of the Erber Research Center in Thailand

Built with natural, functional and sustainable materials, the Erber Research Center was recently opened on the grounds of Kasetsart University at its Khamphaeng Saen Campus in the Nakhon Pathom province of Thailand.
 
http://temp.biomin.net/at/home
The entrance to the new Erber Research Center in Thailand- Source: BIOMIN

150 distinguished guests attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony of the Erber Research Center, a joint effort between Biomin and the Faculty of Agriculture at Kasetsart University’s Kamphaeng Saen Campus in Thailand, which officially opened on December 2, 2014. In line with its R&D slogan, “Turning science into sustainable solutions”, the purpose of the center with its modern trial facilities is to enable the application and testing of new innovative solutions for the animal feed industry.

The Erber Research Center is the sixth investment in a global network of Biomin Centers for Applied Nutrition (CAN). According to Franz Waxenecker, Director of Development at Biomin, the importance of combined laboratory and applied research in a major poultry producing country such as Thailand cannot be overstated.


Specially designed by Austrian architect, Markus Roselieb, the 466-square meter research center boasts a unique design inspired by the traditional Chinese farmhouse courtyard with a mixture of Thai and European features. Made entirely of earth and bamboo, it uses only natural materials with energy saving features, keeping it naturally cool in the hot Thai weather. It is adjoined to a state-of-the-art broiler experiment facility by two large glass windows where visitors are able to observe the chickens during trials without compromising biosecurity or causing stress to the animals.

At the opening ceremony, Dr Erich Erber, founder of Biomin and the Erber Group, said, “I am very happy, thankful and proud that we have built something for the future of Kasetsart University, for the future of the Thai industry, for the future of our youth, students and future generation to feed this world sustainably, healthily and tastily.” Dr. Erber was recently awarded a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) honoris causa by Kasetsart University for his lifetime achievements and contributions to the livestock industry.

D. Erber congratulated Professor Dr Seksom Attamangkune, Dean of the Faculty of Animal Science, for helping to achieve a shared vision. The research center will be run by Assistant Professor Dr Yuwares Ruangpanit, Deputy Head of the Research and Technical Services Department, under the guidance of Associate Professor Dr Neramit Sookmanee, the Head of the Animal Science Department. According to Dr. Yuwares, “[W]e would like our students to be able to contribute to society in terms of animal research, training and also modern developments in animal science. This is something we are very much looking forward to in the near future.”

Dr Apichart Pongsrihadulchai, the Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Cooperatives of Thailand officiated the opening of the research center. Among the distinguished guests in attendance was Dr Duong Duy Dong, Dean of the Faculty of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine from Nong Lam University in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and Dr Tun Pheakdey, President of the University of Management and Economics of Cambodia.

Piyapa Erber, Chief Operating Officer of Biomin Thailand and Kasetsart University graduate said, “A big part of who I am today is because of Kasetsart University and I feel it is time to give back to my alma mater. So at Biomin, we will continue to support the university in any way we can.”


Read more HERE
MAG1502
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

19/12/2014: Aberdeen Grain signs marketing agreement with Frontier Agriculture


North-east grain co-operative Aberdeen Grain Storage Ltd has signed a marketing agreement with Frontier Agriculture, following its decision earlier this week to end its partnership with Openfield, the Press and Journal website reports.

The move to Frontier has long been rumoured to be on the cards following the departure of Openfield’s general manager in Scotland, Bruce Ferguson, who at the time managed the grain businesses at both Aberdeen Grain and Angus Cereals at Montrose.

https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/business/farming/435172/undefined-headline-263/

Mr Ferguson is now Frontier’s general manager for Scotland.

Whiterashes-based Aberdeen Grain has storage and drying capacity for 70,000 tonnes of combinable crops, and recently invested £1.25million in a biomass heating system to dry grain.

The co-operative, which was founded in 1984 and has more than 180 members, will start its new marketing agreement with Frontier from harvest 2015.

Chairman Ian Cruickshank said: “As Aberdeen Grain continues to grow we are looking to the future and feel that the time is right to make this change. We are committed to adding value to our members’ businesses, and this move will bring exciting new opportunities for our growers.”

Meanwhile, Angus Cereals has said it has no plans to follow Aberdeen Grain and this week the Angus Cereals and Openfield partnership signed a new supply agreement with Bairds Malt – Scotland’s largest maltster with premises in Arbroath, Inverness and Penciatland.

Openfield, which trades more than 4.5million tonnes in the UK every year, said it was “disappointed” to lose the Aberdeen Grain connection but its strategic objectives remained unchanged.

The new Angus Cereals agreement with Bairds Malt will cover much of the barley dried and stored and at its Montrose site. The silos and flat stores at Montrose have a capacity of over 40,000 tonnes but that includes some wheat and oilseed rape.

The new contract provides for a close working relationship between the two organisations, including ensuring that members grow the varieties most needed by Bairds Malt and that they are processed and segregated accordingly to maximise the amount of grain that can ultimately be delivered.



Read the article HERE.
 



The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

19/12/2014: Trade with Cuba is opportunity for Kansas US wheat

The possibility of renewing relations with Cuba could mean a significant change in one of the state’s largest commodities, wheat, the KSN website reports.

Wheat is Cuba’s second largest import.

“Right now they’re getting that all from Europe and Canada,” said Gary Millershaski, President of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers.

http://ksn.com/2014/12/18/trade-with-cuba-opportunity-for-ks-wheat/

The US is the largest exporter of the grain, not to mention one of Cuba’s closest neighbours.

“It’s really not made a lot of sense in the past for, for example, Canada to sell wheat to Cuba,” explained Ron Suppes, a representative of Kansas on the US Wheat Board. 

“They go around the US to get down there so [they] have a lot higher freight rates.”

Which means the US could sell wheat at a competitive price or keep the price the same and make more money.

“We’ve tried doing what we’ve been doing for 50 years, and it hasn’t worked, so maybe something new needs to be tried,” Suppes said.

At this point, numbers are speculative, but wheat farmers agree that opening trade with Cuba could mean big business for agriculture. If Cuba could buy from the US, wheat growers could potentially be selling them 500,000 metric tons of wheat every year.

“We’re talking close to 15 percent of what we raised last year could go to Cuba,” said Millershaski.

Because of their location relative to the Gulf, Kansas, Texas, and Oklahoma could be the states to provide the wheat.

“If the market opens up so that there is a possibility, it’s got to be a long term positive for the state,” Millershaski said.



Read more HERE.

 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

December 18, 2014

Altinbilek company profile


http://www.gfmt.co.uk/altinbilik 

Altinbilek is one of the leading companies in Turkey for the manufacture of high-capacity chain conveyors, belt conveyors, bucket elevators, screw conveyorsand a whole range of steel silo components and accessories.
Ever expanding, we now have a plant with an outdoor area of 22,000m2 and an indoor area of 12,000m2 in the Eskisehir Organized Industrial Zone.


Read more HERE.
 


The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

18/12/2014: Wheat prices soar anew, despite 'sceptics'. Corn, soy up too

Tobin Gorey, analyst at Commonwealth Bank of Australia, quoted the aphorism from John Maynard Keynes, the renowned economist, in assessing the rally in wheat futures (which continued on Thursday).

Mr Gorey himself is relatively upbeat on the prospects for wheat prices, which is being driven by concerns of a squeeze on Russian supplies, although he cited the firmness in the US cash market, the Agrimoney website reports.

 

http://www.agrimoney.com/marketreport/wheat-prices-soar-anew-despite-sceptics.-corn-soy-up-too--2933.html

"Physical premiums for US wheat remain firm at port so there's no obvious sign yet that prices have overshot.”

However, he acknowledged that other commentators "are sceptical of the rally's foundations" and that they "might prove to be correct – ultimately. 

"Ultimately, though, can be a long while away.”

Certainly, it had not arrived as of 09:30 UK time (03:30 Chicago time) when wheat futures for March were 2.7 percent higher at US$6.66 a bushel, earlier touching a near-seven-month high, for a spot contract, of US$6.77 a bushel.

At its high, the contract had gained 16.4 percent, nearly US$1 a bushel, in six sessions.

(Given the US harvested 455 million bushels this year of soft red winter wheat, the type traded in Chicago, the gain had also in theory added US$430m to the value of the crop, not including the increases to hard red winter wheat etc as well.)

Not that there was particularly any further news on the ideas of a Russian wheat export squeeze, with the current idea, based on comments from phytosanitary officials, that shipments to a handful of importing countries, such as Egypt, will be fine, but to others… maybe.

"There is talk that phyto certs for many of their best customers will not be taken off the table," Brian Henry at Benson Quinn Commodities said.

The other key issue is whether the declining rouble will prompt farmers to hoard crop, as a dollar-denominated hedge, rather than sell it, so constraining exports too (as well as supplies for the domestic market that Russia needs to have a hope of curtailing food inflation).

In fact, the rouble was showing a small decline, of 0.6 percent, against the dollar, standing at 60.50 roubles to US$1, but remains well above Tuesday's low of nearly 80 roubles to US$1.

Much on this score will depend on a speech later by Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, which will address the country's financial turmoil, and could one of the most important addresses of his career.
  



Read more HERE.
 


The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

18/12/2014: New cooking method turns manure, corn husks into biofuels

Researchers have found that cooking farm waste - especially 'wet' waste such as corn husks, tomato vines and manure - can turn it into biofuels to produce energy, the Business Standard reports.

Dry farm waste, such as wood chips or sawdust, is easier to use for generating power. Scientists have struggled to find uses for wet and green waste.

 

http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/new-cooking-method-turns-manure-corn-husks-into-biofuels-114121800582_1.html

Researchers led by engineering professor Animesh Dutta, director of the Bio-Renewable Innovation Lab (BRIL) at the University of Guelph in Canada, have found a solution: pressure cooking.

 
Cooking farm waste yields compact, easily transportable material that will not degrade and can be used in energy-producing plants.

 
Dutta said the research which is published in the journal Applied Energy, shows that in a lab setting, biofuels can produce the same amount of energy as coal.

"What this means is that we have a resource in farm waste that is readily available, can produce energy at a similar level to burning coal, and does not require any significant start-up costs," said Dutta.
"We are taking what is now a net-negative resource in farm waste, which farmers have to pay to remove, and providing an opportunity for them to make money and help the environment.

 
"It's a closed-loop cycle, meaning we don't have to worry about external costs," Dutta said.

 
The new biofuel product made by the BRIL researchers produces a product that has less alkali and alkaline earth metals, allowing them to be used at power plants.

 
"We're able to produce small amounts of energy in our lab from these biofuels," said Dutta.

 
Dutta said large pressure cookers located near farms could accept and cook waste for transport to energy plants."We're looking at a timeline of five to seven years, depending on the funding," he said.

 
"Once we have a commercial system set up, we'll be self-sufficient. It can reduce our energy costs and provide an environmental benefit," he added. 



Read the article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

18/12/2014: China Buys US Grain Amid Signs Import Ban on GMO Corn to End

China bought as much as 900,000 metric tons of a corn-based grain from the US after the government was said to have approved lifting a ban on a genetically-modified variety of the crop, Bloomberg reports.
 
China signed contracts for as many as 15 cargoes of dried distillers grain for shipment between December and March, according to a report today by the China National Grain and Oils Information Center. China is the largest buyer of the by-product known as DDGS, which is produced when corn is stripped of starch for ethanol production.


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-12-17/china-buys-u-s-grain-amid-signs-import-ban-on-gmo-corn-to-end.html

Purchases fell to as low as 100,000 tons in September and October after some cargoes were found to contain the unapproved MIR 162 strain of corn, according to Sylvia Shi, an analyst at Shanghai JC Intelligence Co Imports were as high as 600,000 tons in June, she said.

 
The government has told traders and officials that the Ministry of Agriculture has approved imports of the MIR 162, a genetically modified corn variety that’s commonly grown in the US, two people familiar with the matter said yesterday. They asked not to be identified because the information hasn’t been made public.

 
“We are all watching whether these newly-bought DDGS cargoes can discharge in Chinese ports smoothly,” said Xia Rui, an analyst at Shanghai Flow International Trade Co. 


“More deals will follow.”
 
China, the biggest market for US food and agricultural products, is seen to be relaxing curbs on corn imports as the government pushes forward with a campaign to gain public acceptance of genetically modified organisms and seeks to expand food supplies. 
  


Read the article HERE.
 


The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

December 17, 2014

Global Industries Inc company profile

http://www.gfmt.co.uk/globalindinc

The Global International sales team is committed to providing cost-effective solutions for clients around the world, using our broad portfolio of grain storage, conditioning and handling products, as well as buildings for the housing of poultry and livestock and wastewater treatment systems.  With offices in Bangkok, Thailand; Buenos Aires, Argentina; and Rostov-on-Don, Russia, we are positioned to serve. 


Read the article HERE.
 


The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

17/12/2014: Smuggled rice, boat missing from Philippine port

About US$200,000 worth of smuggled rice has gone missing — along with the motor launch carrying it — three days after it was intercepted by the Philippine Navy in Zamboanga, Philippines, the Philippine Daily Enquirer reports.

The missing contraband was part of 16,000 50-kilo sacks of imported rice, loaded on four launches that were intercepted on the shoreline of the Recodo district on Monday morning.
 Rear Adm. Reynaldo Yoma, commander of Naval Forces Western Mindanao, said a Navy assault boat was conducting a maritime patrol when it intercepted the vessels on Monday.

 

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/657779/smuggled-rice-boat-missing-from-zamboanga-port

The Navy also intercepted 4550 Falcatta logs in one of the boats.

The total value of the smuggled rice was placed at over US$440,000.

But by Wednesday morning some of the smuggled rice and one of the boats that carried it had vanished from the Zamboanga City port.

“We were shocked to learn this morning (Wednesday) that one of the four vessels our operatives intercepted last Monday is missing from the Zamboanga City port,” said Ensign Ian Chester Ramos, spokesperson of the Naval Forces Western Mindanao.

Yoma said earlier that the confiscated cargo had been turned over to the Bureau of Customs.

“On Tuesday, the boat was still there. We were just notified about the missing boat this morning. Our unit’s hard work was in vain,” Ramos said.

Miguel Saquisami, the newly installed district customs collector, confirmed that one of the boats, ML Ayang, was missing.

He said they were checking reports that the boat was already in Jolo, Sulu.

Saquisami had earlier told the Inquirer by phone that he could not provide details of who owned the cargo and where it came from.

He said some of the crew members of the three remaining boats were being investigated, “but we cannot provide details now because we are trying to apprehend again the ML Ayang.” 




Read the article HERE.
 



The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com