July 31, 2014

31/07/2014: Register for the 7th Protein Summit 2014 in Rotterdam

August 1, 2014 is the last day you can register for the early-bird delegate fee of Euro350.

High protein foods are gaining momentum in Europe. Dairy leaders are launching new products. Key international speakers and experts challenge each other at the 
7th Protein Summit 2014 to discuss the future opportunities.   
 First time together! Take 7 brand leaders - European market - Thrive - Asian market – New Nutrition Business - North-American market – Innova Market Insights - Dairy growth - Arla Foods Amba - Consumer insights – Ipsos - Mainstream nutrition - Glanbia - Brand development – Healthy Marketing Team

3 Tracks for 3 business interests

Key Speakers  
  Ms Hege Charlotte Bakken,  Director, Stella Polaris (NL) Ms Claire Nuttall Founding Partner, Thrive (UK) Mr Michael Paalson CEO, Upfront (Denmark)
 
This unique global protein platform will bring together 150+ industry experts from: 

- Food, Feed & Pet food manufacturers: 
Unilever, Nestlé, Mars, General Mills, VION...

Ingredients: Kerry Foods, Cargill, DSM, DuPont, FrieslandCampina DMV, Novozymes...

Technology: GEA, Alfa Laval, Koch Membrane, Upfront, Bühler, Clextral, Wenger...

Institutes & Research: Frauenhofer, VTT, TSB, NIZO, Leatherhead, Azti, TNO...
Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

31/07/2014: Water management threatened in Australia

Water is what opened up the vast tracks of much of Australia in the late 1800s but recent budget cuts are putting the whole process at risk, reports ABC New's Landline..

Only two percent of the water was actually used for drinking by animals so plans to control the water more efficiently started taking place. Massive gains were made but Government has now walked away from the funding process.


View the video and read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

31/07/2014: AFIA comments on proposed FSMA Sanitary Transportation Rule

The American Feed Industry Association submitted comments to the US Food and Drug Administration yesterday on the proposed Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food rule. The proposed rule is one of many pieces of the Food Safety Modernization Act puzzle, which is considered the largest overall rule of the US feed industry since the 1950s.
 

http://www.afia.org


FSMA requires FDA to create regulations for shippers, carriers by auto transit or railway vehicles and receivers to use sanitary transportation practices to ensure food-including animal food-being transported does not become contaminated. The goal of the sanitary transportation rule is to ensure that transportation practices do not create food safety risks. And although AFIA openly agrees with FDA in certain areas, such as allowing "the industry to continue to use bulk transport equipment in accordance with best practices without limiting industry, by rule, to hauling non-food exclusive of or preceding any food items," the organisation listed numerous points of difference in their nine pages of comments for FDA to review.

In the rule, FDA proposed exemptions for farms and shelf stable products. AFIA suggested those exemptions be broadened to include intra-company shipments (when the company maintains control of the product), short haul transports (as defined by the US Department of Transportation) and finished product or raw agricultural commodities transported from facilities to farms in dedicated vehicles.

"Covering these types of shipments under this regulation would place an undue burden on farms and feed facilities when any minimal risk via transportation is appropriately handled with internal standard operating procedures and dedicated vehicles," said Leah Wilkinson, AFIA director of ingredients, petfood and state affairs.

Similar to AFIA's comments on other FSMA-related rules, AFIA commented that FDA should lower the recommendation on the definition of "non-covered business" to engage businesses with transportation operations with less than US$10,000 in total annual sales. AFIA commented the organization "believes that no firm, regardless of annual sales volume, should be exempt if they are engaged in transportation operations of food" and that everyone has a responsibility to produce safe food.

FDA is proposing carriers of bulk products provide information to the shipper on three previous loads as FDA understood that is current industry practice.
 

"AFIA commented, that while this may be standard practice in some segments of the food industry, it is not current practice across the entire food and animal food industry," explained Wilkinson. 

"Our organisation recommends this section be changed to require identification of one previous load, which is more practical and would fit within a facility's food safety plan procedure more appropriately."

The organisation also made note of the temperature control measures and hand washing facility requirements originally proposed are not appropriate across the animal food industry and would induce unnecessary cost on the industry without improving the safety of animal food products. AFIA urged these requirements to be removed for animal food.

"At the very least, FDA should revise the language in the final rule to make it clear that continuous temperature monitoring is not required for animal food," the comments stated.  


"Currently, temperature control shipments in the animal food industry do not involve the use of continuous time/temperature recording devices for most temperature-controlled shipments as the risk level for animal food safety does not require this practice."

The comments on the proposed sanitary transportation rule were drafted by AFIA members who volunteered as part of a work group to review the rule. FDA, under a court ordered deadline, must issue the final rule on this topic by March 31, 2016.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

30/07/2014: GM resistance growing in BT maize

Genetically modified Bt corn plants in Brazil are failing to deter caterpillar Spodoptera frugiperda, they were designed to kill, reports Popular Science.

Resistance to Bt crops is not new with the first occurring in India in 2009 and more following two years later in the USA.

For the full story on this story click HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

July 30, 2014

30/07/2014: Conservation agriculture as recommended by the FAO

Facing climate change and nine billion mouths to feed by 2050? Conservation Agriculture is key to the future of food security says the FAO from Rome where is recommending five need-to-know points to follow.

http://www.fao.org/zhc/detail-events/en/c/238478/?utm_source=google+&utm_medium=social+media&utm_campaign=fao+google+

In the face of changing weather driven by climate change and the increasing demand for food, Conservation Agriculture (CA) aims to achieve sustainable and profitable agriculture and improve farmers’ livelihoods. Here are five things you need to know.

1. CA observes three main principles that you should remember
Direct seeding involves growing crops without mechanical seedbed preparation and with minimal soil disturbance since the harvest of the previous crop.


A permanent soil cover is important to: protect the soil against the deleterious effects of exposure to rain and sun; provide the micro and macro organisms in the soil with a constant supply of "food"; and alter the microclimate in the soil for optimal growth and development of soil organisms, including plant roots.


The rotation of crops is not only necessary to offer a diverse "diet" to the soil micro organisms, but as they root at different soil depths, they are capable of exploring different soil layers for nutrients.

2. CA helps fight climate change
Only because the effects of climate change are being felt more and more, it does not mean we should give up on efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). With the increasing soil organic matter, the soils under Conservation Agriculture can retain carbon from carbon dioxide and store it safely for long periods of time.


The consumption of fossil fuel for agricultural production is also significantly reduced under CA and burning of crop residues is completely eliminated, which also contributes to a reduction of GHG release.

3. CA provides small-scale farmers with diversification opportunities
CA has direct impacts which have the potential to turn around the daily and seasonal calendar and in the long term change the rhythm of farmers’ family because of the reduced labour requirements for tillage, land preparation and weeding. More time availability offers real opportunities for diversification options such as for example poultry farming or on-farm sales of produce, or other off-farm small enterprise developments. 


FAO argues that support should be given to smallholders to scale-up production. This support should include legal land tenure, global policies for a level playing field, access to capital and markets, structured training, and investment in technology and infrastructure.


4. CA helps lower farm power and reduces labour
One of the most noticeable changes for the farmer is the reduced requirement for farm power and labour. CA helps lower the overall requirement for farm power and energy for field production by up to 60 % compared to conventional farming.

This is due to the fact that the most power intensive operations, such as tillage, are eliminated. Additionally equipment investment, particularly the number and size of tractors, is significantly reduced. This effect applies equally to small-scale farmers using only hand labour or animal traction.


5. Everyone has a role to play
Maintaining the momentum of growth in agricultural productivity will remain crucial in the coming decades as production of basic staple foods needs to increase by 60 percent if it is to meet expected demand growth.


Food is one of our most basic needs, so be it reducing food loss and waste, eating lower-impact diets or investing in sustainable agriculture  such as conservation agriculture - countries, companies, and consumers can make a difference


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

30/07/2014: Silos up for sale in Ukraine

UK company Glencore is trying to sell some of its inland gain silos in war-torn Ukraine where demand for storage is moving away from third-party storage services as farmers are adopting on-farm storage and direct delivery to ports given the export focus of the grain industry in the country.

http://www.glencore.com/media/image-library/


Glencore exported 824,000 tonnes of Ukrainian grain in the first 11 months of the 2013/14 season, or 2.6 percent of the country's total grain exports, according to Kiev-based consultancy ProAgro, with maize dominating the shipments, reports Reuters
 
Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

July 29, 2014

29/07/2014: Genome of African rice sequenced

An international team of researchers have sequenced the complete genome of African rice, enabling the development of new rice varieties that are better able to cope with increasing environmental stresses to help solve global hunger issues, report International Business Times today.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/solution-world-hunger-scientists-sequence-genome-african-rice-solve-nine-billion-people-1458795

The genetic information will also enhance understanding of the growing patterns of African rice.


The effort to sequence the African rice genome was led by Rod Wing, director of the Genomics Institute at the University of Arizona, USA who says
in Science Daily, "Rice feeds half the world, making it the most important food crop.

"Rice will play a key role in helping to solve what we call the nine billion people question." he added, referring to predictions of what the world's population will increase to - many of whom are likely to be living in areas where food is scarce - by 2050.


The question lies in how to grow enough food to feed the world's population and prevent the health, economic and social problems associated with hunger and malnutrition.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

29/07/2014: 25th Annual IAOM

25th Annual IAOM
Mideast and Africa District Conference and Expo”.
Cape Town, South Africa

3 – 6 December 2014
 

Contact:  
IAOM MEA District, PO Box 566, P.C. 112 Ruwi, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman
Tel: +968 2471 2338, Fax: +968 2471 1340,
E.mail: info@iaom-mea.com
or
Ms Shannon Henson, Director of Meetings and Exhibits.
IAOM, International Association of Operative Millers.
12351 W. 96th Terrace, Suite 100 Lenexa, Kansas 66215 USA.
Tel: +1 (913) 338 3377, Fax: +1 (913) 338 3553,
E.mail: shannon.henson@iaom.info, info@iaom.info

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

29/07/2014: A powerful solution of combined surface-active compounds launched

Controlling and saving cost is imperative among feedmills. To boost feedmill profitability, Kemin based in Herentals, Belgium, has introduced KEM WET® Amp – a synergistic mixture of powerful surface-active agents that maximise milling operation efficiencies by optimising the overall conditioning performance and increasing profitability.
 
http://www.kemin.com/products/kem-wet
Inquire here for the product

Feedstuffs represent the largest single cost in the milling process and feedmill managers are continuously challenged to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) that increase productivity and quality, as well as reduce costs and risks. KEM WET Amp is a cost-effective solution for an effective pre-conditioning process, providing benefits through feed manufacturing KPIs.


The product has a special affinity for water-based liquids, reducing surface tension and enhancing transfer, spreading, penetration and stability of water-based solutions in feedstuff materials.


Research studies have shown that KEM WET Amp is more effective and performs more consistently compared to other water and surfactant alternatives. The product’s unique physical properties and combined powerful surface-active agents allow it to penetrate easily into feed particles and distribute uniformly.


“Not only does KEM WET Amp perform better, its economical usage rate is a key benefit for manufacturers,” said Dr. Luis Conchello, veterinarian and Kemin product manager for feed processing technologies. 


“Along with this advanced product, Kemin offers a complete feed conditioning program to help feed mills grow profitability by achieving the highest productivity at the lowest cost, while assuring product quality.”

Kemin, a global leader in liquid technology, has a strong commitment to feed safety and processing. Through TOTAL NUTRITION™, the company offers a range of solutions to keep animals safe, healthy and efficient, while returning a profit.
 

Kemin – Inspired Molecular Solutions™
Kemin (www.kemin.com) provides “inspired molecular solutions” specifically developed to provide nutrition and health benefits for humans and animals. Committed to feed and food safety, Kemin maintains top-of-the-line manufacturing facilities where approximately 500 specialty ingredients are made for the global feed and food industries as well as the health, nutrition and beauty markets.


A privately held, family-owned and operated company, Kemin has nearly 2000 employees and operates in more than 90 countries with manufacturing facilities in Belgium, Brazil, China, India, Italy, Singapore, South Africa and the United States.

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

29/07/2014: USDA urged to immediately restore official Grain Inspection Service

Citing the "extremely troubling precedent" being set, 22 national, regional and state agricultural producer, commodity and agribusiness organizations have urged the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to take immediate action to restore official grain inspection and weighing services at the Port of Vancouver, Wash.
 


In a recent letter to Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and other key administration officials, the organizations cited a July 1 notice by the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) stating that it no longer would fulfill its obligation to provide official grain inspection and weighing services at the Pacific Northwest port. The port is being picketed by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) as part of an ongoing labor dispute. WSDA had been delegated the responsibility to provide official grain inspection and weighing services at the port by USDA's Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA).

Several of the organizations had met last October with GIPSA Administrator Larry Mitchell and other USDA officials to urge that the agency prepare contingency plans to ensure an "immediate and effective" program to continue official services at the port after several previous interruptions in service occurred after WSDA inspectors were ordered by WSDA officials to cease inspections. In the July 1 notice stating that it was suspending official inspection services indefinitely, effective July 7, the director of WSDA's grain inspection program stated as one of the reasons the belief that the "continued provision of inspection services appears to have been unhelpful in leading to any foreseeable resolution" of the labor dispute.

"To our knowledge, this latest announcement by a designated state agency declining to provide official services is unprecedented," the groups wrote in their letter to Vilsack.  


"We believe WSDA's actions create an extremely troubling precedent that will cause irreparable damage to the integrity and reliability of the nation's official grain inspection system."

The organizations also cited the "uncertainty" already created within the US grain export industry, as well as among US agricultural producers and international buyers of US commodities, regarding potential future disruptions of official services at facilities operating at other US export ports.  


"The disruptions that already have occurred have put at risk the United States' reputation as a reliable supplier of grains and oilseeds to foreign customers," the groups wrote.  

"In the absence of WSDA's reliable performance of its duties, FGIS must intervene and make the necessary arrangements to provide the mandatory official (inspection) services."

Federal law prohibits the export of US grains and oilseeds unless officially inspected and weighed by official personnel in accordance with the US grain standards. In addition, such exports are required to be accompanied by official certificates showing the official grade designation and certified weight, unless the requirement is waived by the secretary of agriculture and the grain is not sold or exported by grade. Under the US Grain Standards Act, Congress vested in USDA the responsibility and obligation to provide official inspection services to facilitate efficient and cost-effective marketing of US grains and oilseeds.

"To this point, confidence that the U.S. official grain inspection system will function in a continuous and consistent manner - and not be subject to unwarranted disruptions - has been instrumental in facilitating the ability of US farmers and agribusinesses to reliably serve foreign customers and remain competitive in world markets," the groups wrote in the letter to Vilsack, adding that the system has been a model of integrity.  


"But the recent decision by WSDA and the subsequent inaction to this point of FGIS to fulfill its (statutory) mandate to provide official inspection services risks sullying that hard-earned reputation, to the long-lasting detriment of US agriculture. It also sends a dangerous signal to any third-party that might wish to disrupt US grain export trade."

National organizations signing the letter to Vilsack were: Agricultural Retailers Association; American Farm Bureau Federation; American Soybean Association; National Association of Wheat Growers; National Corn Growers Association; National Grain and Feed Association; National Oilseed Processors Association; North American Export Grain Association; Transportation, Elevator and Grain Merchants Association; US Grains Council; U.S. Soybean Export Council; and U.S. Wheat Associates.

State and regional organizations signing the letter were:  Idaho Grain Producers, Minnesota Grain and Feed Association, Montana Grain Growers Association, North Dakota Grain Dealers Association, North Dakota Grain Growers Association, Oregon Wheat Growers League, South Dakota Grain and Feed Association, South Dakota Wheat Inc., Pacific Northwest Grain and Feed Association, and Washington Association of Wheat Growers.


Read the full letter HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

July 28, 2014

28/07/2014: 6 ways to stay saff in silos from Cleveland Vibrator Company

by Katy Murray of the Cleveland Vibrator Company writes about safety working in silos and outlines six ways companies can keep their employees safe when handling stored grains. The full article can be read HERE.

"Valuing your worker’s safety and well-being are ideas that most can agree on being crucial for company success within dangerous industries such as Grain Handling. Part of my job is updating our Twitter Feed and keeping an eye out for industry news via shared stories and retweets by some of the most credible sources in the material handling industries. 

"Recently, I have been seeing numerous stories about grain entrapment accidents and can’t help but wonder, why does this keep occurring when preventive measures are available? 

"Safety and Health Topics on OSHA’s website can prove to be rather helpful and a great reference to industry procedures, so I started there in my quest to compile this list."

  1. Provide Proper Dust Collection Equipment Within Your Facilities 
  2. Properly Choose Location of Your Dust Collection Equipment
  3. Utilize Proper Vibratory Equipment for Grain Storage Bins
  4. Power Down Any Excess Equipment Pieces Associated with Bin 
  5. Provide All Employees with a Safety Harness
  6. Implement Preventive Maintenance Programs

Note: For more information on this subject, visit OSHA’s web page to stay up-to-date with the latest protocols in industry. 

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

28/07/2014: Canada’s rail transportation system is ready

CN (TSX: CNR) (NYSE: CNI) said today Canada’s rail transportation system is ready to accommodate the new harvest with a solid throughput rate in line with the grain supply chain. The supply chain will also be able to address the excess carry-over from last year's extraordinary crop by as early as next spring.
 
http://www.cn.ca/en/news/2014/07/cn-says-canadas-rail-transportation-system-is-ready-for-the-new-harvest
CN's president and chief executive
Claude Mongeau

Claude Mongeau, president and chief executive, said: “CN posted a record performance in the 2013-2014 crop-year just ending – our movement of Western Canadian grain was a full 25 percent greater than past average performance.


“We can be proud of our performance and for making good on the commitments we gave the federal government a month before the order-in-council requiring railways to move specific grain volumes took effect last March.


“By virtue of normal commercial incentives, the grain handling and transportation system is now fully back in sync and ready to accommodate the upcoming harvest.


“This positive development is very encouraging and calls for careful balance from the federal government in how it pursues the regulatory agenda it announced in haste in the midst of a very difficult winter," he added.


Mongeau said CN transported record grain volumes last fall until extreme cold weather affected the rail industry’s ability to move grain efficiently between mid-December and early March. In February, CN promised the federal government it would ramp back up to record performance as soon as the weather eased – and it did just that. The weather clearly challenged CN’s operations, but the company’s winter grain shipments ultimately turned out to be only two percent below normal winter volumes.


About CN
CN – Canadian National Railway Company, along with its operating railway subsidiaries -- serves the cities and ports of Vancouver, Prince Rupert, B.C., Montreal, Halifax, New Orleans and Mobile, Ala. and the metropolitan areas of Toronto, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Calgary, Chicago, Memphis, Detroit, Duluth, Minn./Superior, Wis. and Jackson, Miss. with connections to all points in North America.


CN (TSX: CNR) (NYSE: CNI) is a true backbone of the economy, transporting approximately C$250 billion worth of goods annually for a wide range of business sectors, ranging from resource products to manufactured products to consumer goods, across a rail network spanning Canada and mid-America. 

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

28/07/2014: Program to reduce post-harvest loss and food waste

Romer Labs, a leading supplier of food safety diagnostics solutions has partnered with the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for the 'Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss' based at Kansas State University, USA, to donate mycotoxin testing supplies to their USAID project aimed at reducing post-harvest loss.  
 
Romer Labs’ AgraStrip Aflatoxin and Fumonisin test strips


This Feed the Future Innovation Lab is part of the US government's Feed the Future initiative to reduce global hunger and improve food security. The initiative uses research, education and outreach to advance solutions to hunger, poverty and under-nutrition in low-income countries.
 

Romer Labs' AgraStrip Aflatoxin and Fumonisin test strips and AgraVision reader will be used in these remote growing areas to assess the extent of the mycotoxin contamination.  

Using the data obtained in the study, the goal is to enhance the drying, conditioning, handling, storage, pest management and transportation of these crops thus increasing the quantity and quality of the grain available for human consumption and decreasing food waste.
 

This Feed the Future Innovation Lab is part of the U.S. government's Feed the Future initiative to reduce global hunger and improve food security. The initiative uses research, education and outreach to advance solutions to hunger, poverty and under-nutrition in low-income countries.
 

The project aims to provide global leadership to reduce post-harvest loss (PHL) and food waste of durable staple crops (grains, oilseeds, legumes, root crops, seeds) and their processed value-added products with an initial focus on four Feed the Future (FtF) countries (Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana and Guatemala). Interventions under this project will integrate smallholder farmers, producer cooperatives, and agribusiness enterprises with market-based value chains.
 

A key challenge in a number of Feed the Future countries is high moisture content of grains (especially maize) at harvest and presence of high mycotoxin levels (especially aflatoxin) at harvest and postharvest due to improper drying and storage practices. The initial pilot projects in Guatemala and Ghana will involve assessing the level of the problem faced by small holder farmers and the first market collection points and ways to address this problem. Current practices allow for wet maize that often contains high levels of aflatoxin to enter the market and be consumed by farmers and villagers causing nutrition and health problems for children and adults.
 

Romer Labs’ AgraStrip Aflatoxin and Fumonisin test strips and AgraVision reader will be used in these remote growing areas to assess the extent of the mycotoxin contamination. Using the data obtained in the study, the goal is to enhance the drying, conditioning, handling, storage, pest management and transportation of these crops thus increasing the quantity and quality of the grain available for human consumption and decreasing food waste.

About Romer Labs
Romer Labs, founded in Washington, MO, in 1982, is a leading provider in diagnostic solutions for food and feed safety. It develops, manufacturers and markets rapid test kits for food allergens, food pathogens, mycotoxins, veterinary drug residues and other food contaminants. The company also operates four accredited full-service laboratories on three continents. Romer Labs has facilities in Austria, Brazil, China, Malaysia, Singapore, the UK and the USA. 


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

28/07/2014: Dinnissen presents new range of hammer mills with focus on multitasking at Powtech in Nürnberg

Dinnissen Process Technology specializes in the development and production of process technologies and equipment for the feed, food, pharma and chemical industries. 

Dinnissen is now offering a new and extremely wide range of hammer mills that provide an effective solution for any challenge when it comes to grinding and screening even the most difficult ingredients. 
 
http://www.dinnissen.nl
New complete range of hammer mills with focus on multitasking


The new hammer mills, which are on view at the Powtech and Industrial Processing, are characterised by a broad range of capacities and product output particle size as well as flexibility and special add-on functionalities, making them real multitasking 'monsters'.

Enormous range of screening panels, perforations and functionalities
Hammer mills are particularly suited for grinding soft to medium-hard products such as grains, herbs, spices, protein-rich ingredients, nutrients, premixes and minerals. Dinnissen’s new range of multitasking hammer mills enables the user to screen output particles ranging in size from 3mm down to 150 microns. 


Single hammers or double hammers are used depending upon the specific ingredients to be grinded down. A crucial feature of the new product range is the enormous range of screening panels, surfaces and perforations available, as these features determine the capacity, quality and effectiveness of the screening process and make it possible for Dinnissen to offer its clients an effective solution for practically any grinding and/or screening challenge. Two rather striking members of the new product range are the small Easy-to-Clean DINNOX Mill and the Dinnissen D-Topline Hamer hammer mill with automatic screen changer.
 

From the small Easy-to-Clean DINNOX Mill
This mill is a very compact hammer mill with a minimum capacity of 30kg per hour. It is fitted with exchangeable grinding rotors, providing it with a variety of breaking, cutting and grinding functionalities, as well as exchangeable screening panels and adjustable RPMs. 


This allows the user to easily and quickly switch between an almost endless variety of grinding and screening applications, depending upon the specific ingredients process and the desired end result. In spite of its very compact design, the new mill is also fitted with completely detachable grinding rotors and extra-large inspection hatches, making it easy to access all the components, including the screening panels, and to clean everything quickly and thoroughly. 

The DINNOX is available in stainless steel 304, RVS 316L and polished or electrolytically polished RVS. It can also be fitted with an automatic cleaning system based on compressed air, CIP or hot steam/air for extra hygienic applications and complies with all EHEDG requirements.

To the D-Topline Hamex hammer mill with automatic screen changer
Dinnissen’s largest and most sophisticated hammer mill will also be on view at the Powtech in Nürnberg. The new D-Topline Hamex Hammer mill with automatic screen changer can handle grinding capacities of up to 45,000kg per hour and the screen changer has space for four to six different sets of screening panels. 


The 'mechatronic' screen changing system automatically selects and places the appropriate set of screening panels in the hammer mill. After the production process has been completed, it also removes and stores the screening panels in less than 40 seconds. 

This makes it possible to change screens extremely quickly and greatly reduces downtime. 

The D-Topline Hamex hammer mill features a new and ingenious design which greatly increases the surface area of the grinding and screening panels inside the hammer mill, which in turn provides increased grinding and ringing capacity. The screen storage facility is also fitted with an extra-wide chamber that can be automatically opened. 

This makes it easier to carry out maintenance and remove damaged screens if necessary, thereby minimizing downtime. The new hammer mill has a maximum speed of 1500rpm, giving it a longer usable lifetime and in lower energy consumption than its predecessors.

Dinnissen’s new range of hammer mills will be on view during Powtech (Stand 4-323) and Industrial Processing (Stand 10 B038).  

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

28/07/2014: Registration open for AFIA-KSU HACCP Short Course

The American Feed Industry Association in partnership with the International Grains Program Institute at Kansas State University and the National Grain and Feed Association will offer a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points course from October 13-16, 2014, at the IGP Institute Conference Center in Manhattan, Kansas. 

http://www.afia.org
The program will focus on providing participants with the necessary preventative methods and principles to ensure food safety.

The course, 'Establishing a HACCP Program for the Feed Industry,' is designed for all individuals within the feed industry, but particularly pertains to feedmill managers, quality assurance personnel and ingredient suppliers. During the course, participants will become familiar with the feed industry regulations and learn how to execute an effective HACCP plan through a seven-step process.


Carlos Campabadal, IGP Institute feed manufacturing program specialist and course manager, will conduct the course. Course participation is limited and seats are reserved on a first come, first served basis. Click here to register for the HACCP program.


AFIA has partnered with KSU since 1976 to host short courses pertaining to the feed industry. The courses are taught by a diverse blend of individuals from KSU and within the feed and allied industries and provide in-depth trainings on all aspects related to feed manufacturing.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

July 25, 2014

25/07/2014: 4th International Rice Congress (IRC2014)


http://irri-news.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/temperate-rice-on-global-stage.htmlTemperate rice—or rice that grows in cold climates—will figure prominently at the 4th International Rice Congress (IRC2014) in two events—the 5th Temperate Rice Conference, or TRC5, and the annual meeting of the Temperate Rice Research Consortium (TRRC). IRC2014 will be held in Bangkok, Thailand, on 27 October 27-1 November 2014.

 

Temperate rice is grown in higher latitudes, where temperatures are generally lower. In these regions,the days are longer during the summer growing season, improving the chances of better crop growth and yield.

Because of more sunlight hours, temperate rice yields about 10 tons of paddy per hectare—almost double the tropical average. Thus, despite a far smaller total temperate rice area compared to its tropical counterpart—and the fact that only one crop a year is possible—temperate rice accounts for about 20% of global rice production.

Rice-growing in temperate regions comes with its own set of concerns. One of these is blast, a fungal disease that thrives better in the cold and, thus, causes more damage. Blast damage is compounded by the effect of extreme temperatures at critical points in the growth of the rice plant.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

25/07/2014: Bühler wins Food Technology Industrial Achievement Award

Bühler Barth has received the 2014 Food Technology Industrial Achievement Award for its research to preserve the hygienic and sanitary quality of foods in order to maintain the highest food safety standards for the sake of the health of the consumer and development of the Controlled Condensation Pasteurisation Process (CCP), which was designed specifically to answer requirements to maintain natural quality of raw almonds. 



The CCP pasteurisation technology pasteurises particulate food items under humid conditions and controlled condensation of steam at the product surface. 

The CCP pasteurisation technology is an impressive example of straightforward technological development in combination with engineering skills on sound physical principles, and by strictly observing quality requirements of food products. Congratulations to the team!

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

25/07/2014: Some countries moving closer to eradicating hunger

Chile, China and Morocco won recognition from FAO for outstanding progress in fighting hunger, an achievement that sees them join a growing group of countries to have reached international targets ahead of an end-of-2015 deadline. They join others in moving closer to eradicating hunger.
 

FAO recognizes Chile, China and Morocco as the latest in a growing list of countries to reduce hunger, but urges stronger efforts to eradicate undernourishment

http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/235416/icode/
MDG Goals Award Ceremony. (Left to Right) Chen Xiaohua, Vice Minister of Agriculture of China, Carlos Furche, Minister for Agriculture of Chile, FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva and Aziz Akhannouch, Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries of Morocco.

During a ceremony at FAO headquarters, the Organization's Director-General, José Graziano da Silva, awarded diplomas to China and Morocco for obtaining the Millennium Development Goal 1 (MDG-1). Chile, which had already reached its MDG-1 target, received the diploma for achieving the 1996 World Food Summit (WFS) target.

The MDG-1 hunger target requires countries to halve the proportion of hungry people in the population before the end of 2015 compared to the level in 1990. The more ambitious WFS goal requires countries to at least halve the number of hungry people in the population before the end of 2015 compared to the level in 1990.

"One year ago we celebrated the first 38 countries that had achieved  the MDG target, three years in advance of the 2015 deadline. 18 of them had also met the World Food Summit target. Now we come together to recognize three more countries for their efforts," Graziano da Silva said.

He stressed that the overall global objective remains the total eradication of hunger and malnutrition. 


"Even today, in a world of abundant food over 840 million people are still undernourished," the FAO Director-General said. 

"Ensuring food security and helping people overcome extreme poverty are the first steps to build the inclusive future we want, in which nobody is left behind," he added.

Chile's Minister of Agriculture Carlos Furche, Morocco's Minister of Agriculture and Marine Fisheries, Aziz Akhannouch and China's Vice Minister of Agriculture, Chen Xiaohua, represented their respective countries at the ceremony.

The WFS goal was set in 1996, when 180 nations met in Rome to discuss ways to end hunger. The MDG 1 target was established by the international community at the UN General Assembly in 2000.

Transforming commitment into effective action

Forty countries have now achieved the MDG -1 while of these, 19 have achieved the WFS target. Such achievements, the FAO chief said, show how "the political commitment of governments is being transformed into effective action and concrete results in the fight against hunger."

He pointed out "strong regional commitments that support and stimulate national efforts to end hunger" including the 2025 Latin America and Caribbean Hunger-Free Initiative, moves by the African Union to endorse a zero hunger target for 2025 and the Asia-Pacific's embracing of the UN Zero Hunger Challenge.

"These are efforts that are supported by non-state actors and by the international community. They show that food security can be a reality in our lifetime," Graziano da Silva said.

During the ceremony, the FAO chief also commended 16 countries for having maintained their hunger rates below five percent dating back to at least 1990: Argentina, Barbados, Dominica, Brunei Darussalam, Egypt , Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mexico, Republic of Korea, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates.

Awards are based on statistics produced by FAO using data provided by member countries and other international agencies.

In an effort to seek renewed global commitment to ending hunger and in particular ensuring that people around the world have access to healthier diets, FAO and the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) will co-organize a high-level, global intergovernmental meeting, the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) which is scheduled to take place in Rome on 19-21 November 2014.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

25/07/2014: From food aid to nutritious, locally produced food: A look at fortifying flour in Ethiopia

by Jeff Dykstra, CEO of Partners in Food Solutions

Right now in Ethiopia, nearly half of all children under the age of five are stunted and anemic. Not only are they short for their age, but they also suffer from diminished cognitive abilities and are more vulnerable to health problems overall.

A girl from the Suri tribe in Ethiopia carrying a calabash with corn flour.
Photo by: Dietmar Temps / CC BY-NC-SA

According to the World Food Program, stunted children are more likely to repeat grades in school and achieve, on average, a year less schooling than other children. Nearly one third of child mortality in Ethiopia is associated with undernutrition.


The economic impact is immediately apparent: a less prepared, smaller adult workforce and an annual hit to Ethiopia’s GDP estimated at US$450 million. A weakened economy only feeds back into the vicious cycle; fewer internal resources are available to feed the population and invest in economic development.

At 'Partners in Food Solutions', however, we like to see that vicious cycle as a potentially virtuous cycle. When you turn it around, it means that better nutrition and sustained food security can drive economic growth. One crucial, but often overlooked, component of better nutrition is the fortification of basic foodstuffs.


In Ethiopia and throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa, food insecurity is often coupled with lower-quality food — an unvaried diet low in micronutrients. Wheat and other grains make up about two thirds of Ethiopians’ calorie intake, but until very recently, not a single food processor in the country was fortifying flour.


That recently changed. ASTCO, a growing milling business based in Addis Ababa, has become the first company in Ethiopia to produce fortified flour. 


The impact on the health of the population and the strength of the Ethiopian economy could be immense, as 19 more millers may soon be part of a network of outlets making fortified products available to customers throughout the country.

ASTCO and hundreds of small and growing food processors in Africa are clients of Partners in Food Solutions. These entrepreneurs are building profitable businesses that can raise living standards in their communities by enabling them to buy more crops from local farmers, hire more workers and provide higher-quality, less expensive food. To maximize the opportunity, many processors are looking for technical and business counsel. In ASTCO’s case, that meant establishing a process to fortify its flour.


That is where 'Partners in Food Solutions' comes in. We connect professionals at multinational food companies, including Royal DSM, the world’s leader in micronutrients, with businesses like ASTCO. Then we make it possible for these volunteers to reach across the globe without ever leaving their offices or labs. They use email, Skype and our cloud-based software to connect with businesses in Africa. This is remote knowledge transfer. We’re not sending money or food; we’re not using finite resources to send volunteers over to do the work; we’re sending our knowledge and skills — resources that only multiply as you share them.


In partnership with the US Agency for International Development and the African Alliance for Improved Food Processing, 'Partners in Food Solutions' and partner TechnoServe are currently working with 20 Ethiopian food processors on fortification. 


But, thanks to the on-the-ground expertise of TechnoServe, we know that the vast majority of Ethiopians in rural areas can’t buy flour and processed products from these producers. Instead, they eat grains ground to order by thousands of tiny traditional hammer-and-stone milling shops.

Nutritional deficiencies during pregnancy and the first two years of life can’t be reversed, but they can be prevented. ASTCO and other African food companies have the will to reverse the trend so that in the future, two thirds of all Ethiopian adults need not have suffered from stunted growth as children. The food companies we assist are eager to see a healthy, happy population and a thriving economy, and they are eager to succeed as businesses in their own right.



Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

25/07/2014: Cassandra Kusmisz joins AFIA as communications specialist

The American Feed Industry Association welcomes Cassandra Kusmisz as its new communications specialist. The newly created position will work in collaboration with Miranda McDaniel, AFIA's manager of communications, to focus on the organisation's communications efforts.

http://www.afia.org/afia/home.aspx
Cassandra Kusmisz, AFIA's new communications specialist

Ms Kusmisz will serve as the primary lead for AFIA's social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn and assist in the maintenance of AFIA's online newsroom. She will also assist in content creation for the association's newsletter, FeedGram and The AFIA Journal, as well as event-related communications.

"We are pleased to welcome Cassie as the newest member of the AFIA team," said McDaniel. 


"Her communications degree partnered with her passion for agriculture are valuable assets to the organization and our members as we continue to provide a well-heard voice for the total feed industry."
 
Ms Kusmisz is a recent graduate of the University of Georgia, where she earned a bachelor's degree in agricultural communication and an interdisciplinary certificate in leadership and service. She has held internships with the Georgia Department of Agriculture and Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications Department at UGA. Ms Kusmisz also participated in a study abroad program, which focused on agricultural sustainability, in Uruguay.
 
Cassandra Kusmisz can be reached at: (703) 666-8851 or ckusmisz@afia.org.
 

About AFIA
The American Feed Industry Association, based in Arlington, Va. is the world's largest organization devoted exclusively to representing the business, legislative and regulatory interests of the US animal feed industry and its suppliers. Founded in 1909, the organization membership is comprised of the total feed industry-from commercial and integrated feed manufacturers, to ingredient suppliers, pet food manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies, industry support and equipment manufacturers. AFIA is also the recognized leader on international industry developments and holds membership in the International Feed Industry Federation.

Members include more than 575 domestic and international companies. More than 75 percent of the commercial feed and 70 percent of the non-grain ingredients including soybean meal, distillers co-products, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, yeast products and other miscellaneous/specialty ingredients in the US are manufactured by AFIA members.
 


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

25/07/2014: How to stop your poultry piling up

In an open letter to the UK's The Guardian newspaper today and in response to the 'Food Standards Agency investigates poultry factories,' Jonathan Wilkins of European Automation relies:
 

Sir, 

The recent Guardian article depicting chicken meat piled on a bloody floor after a pump malfunction at the 2 Sisters factory in Anglesey has undoubtedly rekindled British worries about food hygiene.

Campylobacter is the most common form of food poisoning in the UK. Photograph: Alamy

The incident is particularly pertinent because the memory of the horsemeat scandal, and before that the Bernard Matthews exposé, are still clear in the minds of the public.


Food and beverage is an industry of continuous manufacturing, in which even a couple of hours of downtime can result in huge losses. In the case of the 2 Sisters factory, it was a straightforward pump failure that caused a horrific pile up of entrails, which spilled over onto the floor. A statement released by the company explains that to stop the production line would have resulted in a breach of animal welfare policy. Perhaps the company’s chosen course of action was not the best solution but it should never have had to make the choice in the first place.


The UK poultry industry investigation highlights the importance of keeping manufacturing up and running, especially in the food and beverage industry. To guarantee quality standards, the system needs to be in full working order and critical spare parts should be available immediately, or in a very short time. Having a functional manufacturing line and the necessary spare parts is the best way to make sure food isn't contaminated. The rule applies across all industries, but is particularly important for food and beverage manufacturers that can impact on the health of millions of people.
 

Best regards,
Jonathan Wilkins
Marketing Manager 

European Automation
Unit 3, Parker Court
Staffordshire Technology Park
Stafford, ST18 0WP
Tel: +44 (0)845 521 3088
E-mail: jonathan.wilkins@euautomation.com


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com