February 23, 2017

Zhengchang company profile




Zhengchang, established in 1918, has made constant innovations in feed machinery industry and accumulated a wealth of experience in tackling the various challenges facing feed companies and, more importantly, is able to offer a range of comprehensive solutions.

Zhengchang has now evolved into China’s largest manufacture of feed machinery and has 16 branches in China with over 1300 staff and more than thirty offices all over the world. 

Zhengchang to date has successfully constructed more than 2000 turnkey projects world around the world, covering fields of poultry and livestock feed, aquatic feed, pet feed, premix feed, sawdust pellet, fertiliser, silo storage, pasture, electrical control and garbage treatment, etc.

Zhengchang projects are designed to deliver to the client higher feed quality, higher overall capacity and more profits. 
Zhengchang have conquered challenges one after another for the customers and accumulated rich experience over the past 90 years.

They are now making great endeavors to apply their latest achievements to feed, pasture, environment protection, fertilizer, sawdust shaping industries.


Zhengchang is more than a professional partner who can provide advanced machinery, technology and management ideas.

It is also a true problem solver who knows you well during your development. Zhengchang is with you every step of the way.


Visit the website HERE.

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

24/02/20017: JTIC 2016, French milling industry celebrates in Paris

by Andrew Wilkinson, Milling and Grain

Much has happened in France over the past year or so that has brought international sympathy and support to the country


It almost goes without saying that some of these events, and the depth of the ensuing media coverage, may have tinged one’s perception of the country, with many visitors now approaching France with slight apprehension. But then you arrive in Paris.
 


Paris is a city of history, of beauty – for every one bad memory there are a million good ones and it was against this back drop that this year’s edition of Journées Techniques des Industries Cérèalières (JTIC) took place.

Set within Porte de la Villette, a bustling rich industrial tapestry woven from roadways and railway lines, the Paris Event Centre’s appearance was what could best be described as functional, but not ugly by any means.

However, the building and its location served to further demarcate between the work and pleasure aspect of Milling and Grain’s media partnership, all with a great exhibition stand.

Bustling first day
JTIC was held from November 9-10, 2016. The first day of the show was bustling, but not overly busy. This simmering of interaction allowed for exhibitors and visitors to converse at a not too brisk pace or volume.

Inside the main hall, some 2500m2 of space was reserved for all 130 exhibitors. The show ‘furniture’ was by no means imposing and the various avenues and thoroughfares afforded were adequate to allow typical continental European-style, close-quarters mingling.

As for the people, well the exhibitors were all very well informed, friendly and helpful. I am able to say first hand that compared to some others I have visited, those in attendance at JTIC 2016 were more than happy to answer all of my questions – with my more seasoned colleagues also feeling adequately enriched by those that they had the pleasure of encountering.

Milling and Grain’s recent Business Development Manager in France, Antoine Tanguy, was present for both days of JTIC, along with two translated versions of Milling and Grain.

This JTIC was different with a new version for Milling and Grain; its sixth language edition, launching Milling and Grain for the French, North African and other French-speaking regions of the world. The reaction and feedback was fantastic for both Antoine and the French versions of the magazines.

Meeting with millers, suppliers, academics, students, consultants, industry organisations and others allowed all copies of the French edition to be distributed. Its popularity was impressive. Antoine was able to network with the industry and bolster an international aspect to Milling and Grain.

Milling and Grain magazine in French is proudly here to stay and it was established with the industry endorsing it from the French capital city itself.

Read the French edition of Milling and Grain magazine HERE.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

24/02/2017: Drought is pushing food prices up sharply in East Africa

Soaring cost of basic staples is an extra challenge for pastoralists as livestock prices fall

Drought throughout East Africa has sharply curbed harvests and pushed the prices of cereals and other staple foods to unusually high levels, posing a heavy burden to households and special risks for pastoralists in the region.

Local prices of maize, sorghum and other cereals are near or at record levels in swathes of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania, according to the latest Food Price Monitoring andAnalysis Bulletin (FPMA).

  
Image: Leonora (Ellie) Enking
Inadequate rainfall in most areas of the sub-region has put enormous strain on livestock and their keepers.

Poor livestock body conditions due to pasture and water shortages and forcible culls mean animals command lower prices, leaving pastoralists with even less income to purchase basic foodstuffs.

"Sharply increasing prices are severely constraining food access for large numbers of households with alarming consequences in terms of food insecurity," said Mario Zappacosta, FAO senior economist and coordinator of the Global Information and Early Warning System.

The trends in East Africa, where prices of staple cereals have doubled in some town markets, stand in marked contrast to the stable trend of FAO's Food Price Index, which measures the monthly change in international prices of a basket of traded food commodities.

The difference is due to the drought that is hammering the sub-region, where food stocks were already depleted by the strong El Niño weather event that ended only last year. Poor and erratic rainfall in recent months, crucial for local growing seasons, are denting farm output.

Somalia's maize and sorghum harvests are estimated to be 75 percent down from their usual level, and some 6.2 million people, more than half of the country's total population, now face acute food insecurity, with the majority of those most affected living in rural areas.

Soaring prices

The FPMA Bulletin tracks food price trends on a granular level and in local terms, with an eye to flagging instances where the prices of essential food commodities increase sharply or are abnormally high.

In Mogadishu, prices of maize increased by 23 percent in January, and. the increase was even sharper in the main maize producing region of Lower Shabelle.

Overall, in key market towns of central and southern Somalia, coarse grain prices in January have doubled from a year earlier.

With an earlier than usual depletion of household stocks during the coming lean season and preliminary weather forecasts raising concerns for the performance of the next rainy season, prices are likely to further escalate in the coming months. 

Maize prices in Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, have almost doubled since early 2016, while they are 25 percent higher than 12 months earlier in the country's largest city, Dar Es Salaam. 


In South Sudan, food prices are now two to four times above their levels of a year earlier, exacerbated by ongoing insecurity and the significant depreciation of the local currency.

In Kenya, where eastern and coastal lowlands as well as some western areas of the Rift Valley all suffered below-average rainfall, maize prices are up by around 30 percent, with the increase somewhat contained somewhat thanks to sustained imports from Uganda. Cereal prices aren't the only ones rising.

Beans now cost 40 percent more in Kenya than a year earlier, while in Uganda - where maize prices are now up to 75 percent higher than a year earlier - and increasing around the key border trading hub of Busia, the prices of beans and cassava flour are both about 25 percent higher than a year ago in the capital city, Kampala.

Double jeopardy for pastoralists

Drought-affected pastoral areas in the region face even harsher conditions. In Somalia, goat prices are up to 60 percent lower than a year ago, while in pastoralist areas of Kenya the prices of goats declined by up to 30 percent over the last twelve months.

Shortages of pasture and water caused livestock deaths and reduced body mass, prompting herders to sell animals while they can, as is also occurring in drought-wracked southern Ethiopia. This also pushes up the prices of milk, which is, for instance, up 40 percent on the year in Somalia's Gedo region.

Lower income from livestock collides with higher prices for cereals and other staple foods in a wrenching shock to terms of trade for pastoralist households. A medium-sized goat in Somalia's Buale market was worth 114 kilograms of maize in January 2016, but at today's prices can be traded for only 30 kilograms of the grain.

FAO uses its proprietary FPMA Tool, accessible to the public online, to monitor local markets and gather data for more than 1350 domestic price series in 91 countries around the globe in order to produce its Indicator of Food Price Anomalies

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

24/02/2017: New appointee to head up blender trials facility

A new Blender Trials facility at powder processing specialist British Rema will be headed up by Dr Jose Carmelo Santana Perdomo

He joins the company from The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology, part of the University of Greenwich and recognised internationally for its expertise in fields associated with bulk particulate handling.

 
Image: David Pacey
The dedicated facility will allow British Rema to develop test protocols to predict and optimise the process of blending powders and testing in relation to blend development.

In particular, it will develop a better understanding of the variables involved in the powder mixing process and help to examine the effects of different types of blenders, as well as process and design parameters.

It will also allow the comparison of potential new blend constituents with existing ones and the re-formulation of the original blended powder to obtain a homogeneous product when required. This will greatly assist British Rema’s customers in their choice of the right blending solution for their application.

Dr Perdomo’s experience and expertise in the field of blending includes a PhD based on the development of a test protocol for industry to predict and optimise flow behaviour of blended powders utilising particle to bulk scale models.

He has also worked as a product development engineer in the field of mixing and blending with a manufacturer of polymer granule and master batch mixing equipment, and as a research engineer for powder management at the Manufacturing Technology Centre in Coventry.

Here he worked on projects related to Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing), a key growing application for British Rema’s tumble blenders. In addition to heading up the blender trials facility, Dr Perdomo will also be involved in various aspects of project engineering on milling and classification projects within both British Rema’s equipment and contract processing divisions.

British Rema specialises in the blending, milling, micronising and classification of powders and is a leading supplier of powder processing equipment and contract processing services for the Chemical, Food, Metal Powders, Mineral, Pharmaceutical and Plastics industries.

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

February 22, 2017

Alapala company profile



Establishing plants at any desired capacity, Alapala Machine is a company that exports 95 percent of its current production today and has hundreds of references in over 75 countries in 4 continents including developed industrial countries such as Belgium, France, Italy, Canada and USA. Alapala continually develops and expands thanks to its superior technology infrastructure, perfectionist staff and management, and its quality and customer-oriented approach.

It renders the best before-sales and after-sales services with its staff specialized in their industry, overseas representatives, strong service networks and spare-part stocks.

Alapala can manufacture quality and high performance machinery where the best efficiency ad products can be obtained in the production facilities that have the most developed and state-of-the art technology.
Alapala’s lines of business:

•    Wheat flour mills,
•    Semolina mills,
•    Corn flour mills,
•    Rice processing plants,
•    Feed mills,
•    Cereal storage systems,
•    Weighing, conveying, packing equipment
•    Harbour facilities under the licence of Tramco Inc-USA

 

Read more HERE.


 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

23/02/2017: Hansen-Mueller announces New Fremont, Nebraska facility

Hansen-Mueller Co., a grain industry leader based in Omaha, Neb., announced today that they will locate a state-of-the-art bagging facility in Fremont, Neb. for animal and pet food products

“We are happy to bring an expansion of our current operations to Fremont and become a part of this business community. We located an existing building that met our needs and were able to acquire that facility.” said Jack Hansen, founder and president of Hansen-Mueller Co.

   
Image: Ian Sane
Mayor Scott Getzschman of Fremont echoed Mr Hansen’s sentiments, “This project is a great win for Fremont. The operations fit into our animal food manufacturing target industry, which speaks to why our community is a great fit for Hansen-Mueller Co.”

“It was a pleasure working with the Hansen-Mueller Co. team and supporting them as they explored Fremont,” said Cecilia Harry, executive director of the Greater Fremont Development Council.

“They will be a great addition to our animal food manufacturing footprint and our greater business community.”

The first phase of the project will initially create five – 10 jobs with a multi-million dollar investment.

The firm purchased a 60,000 square foot facility on South Union St. in Fremont.

The operations will include state-of-the-art conventional and organic bagging lines for animal and pet foods packaged under a number of well-known brand names, several private label companies and Hansen-Mueller’s own branded products.

The lines are designed to ensure that the integrity of the organic lines remains intact, which will deliver premium organic products to customers.

Hansen-Mueller Co. believes there is tremendous potential for the project to grow in the future.

They also appreciate that Fremont has made it possible for their contractors to stay in the community during the construction phase to maximise the positive impact the project will have on the community.

 Hansen-Mueller Co. is also happy to announce that long time Fremont resident, Kathy Butler, has been named as Facility Manager for the new operation.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

23/02/2017: EuroTier 2016, record breaking

A record-breaking 2,629 exhibitors and 163,000 visitors descended upon Germany’s famous Fairgrounds conference centre in Hanover from November 15-18, 2016 for what has been referred to as the world’s leading trade fair for animal production, EuroTier

Covering 240,000m2 in floor space, the four-day trade show attracted an impressive 36,000 visitors from over 100 countries outside of Germany and certainly lived up to its past success.
 

Highlighting the social, political and economic influences upon the marketplace, EuroTier’s attendees included several members of German parliament from both federal and state government, as well as high-ranking delegations from all over the world.

In fact, more visitors than ever before came from North and South America, as well as from the Middle and Far East. The EnergyDecentral exhibition ran alongside EuroTier, which has established itself as the international meeting place for the innovative energy supply industry.

Driving innovation and excellence, with this year’s theme of ‘animal health and welfare’ in mind, exhibitors presented product developments for a vast array of agricultural practices worldwide including breeding animals, feed storage and climate control and environmental technology.

Organised by the DLG (German Agricultural Society), the trade show spanned almost 30 halls, with each offering great food, great company and most importantly of all, concrete evidence of sustainable and efficient innovation.

Indeed, the interactive nature of the show once again proved to be its greatest asset with companies able to demonstrate live versions of their products in the flesh. All the stops were pulled and the companies’ efforts really couldn’t have looked any better.

To give an idea of the sheer size and scale of the show and what was being shown, the majority of halls offered their own niche within the agricultural industry, ranging from breeding/hatching technology in hall 2, to compound feed, feed components and additives in halls 18, 20, 22 and 23.

In hall 4 ‘poultry slaughtering and processing, egg grading and processing, special indoor emission control and poultry forum’, there was even an abundance of livestock present.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com